2015 Printz Award Winners and Honors

The Michael L. Printz Award annually honors the best book written for teens, based entirely on its literary merit, each year. In addition, the Printz Committee names up to four honor books, which also represent the best writing in young adult literature. It is named for a Topeka, Kansas school librarian who was a long-time active member of the Young Adult Library Services Association.  The award is sponsored by Booklist, a publication of the American Library Association.

Congratulations from the Indy Public Library!

Winner:

sunI’ll Give you the Sun, by Jandy Nelson

Available in Print, CD Audiobook, and Ebook.

“A story of first love, family, loss, and betrayal told from different points in time, and in separate voices, by artists Jude and her twin brother Noah”– Provided by publisher.

 

 

 

Honors:

stayAnd We Stay, by Jenny Hubbard

Available in Print, Ebook, and Downloadable Audiobook.

Sent to an Amherst, Massachusetts, boarding school after her ex-boyfriend shoots himself, seventeen-year-old Emily expresses herself through poetry as she relives their relationship, copes with her guilt, and begins to heal.

 

 

brayThe Carnival at Bray, by Jessie Ann Foley

Available in Print, and Ebook.  

Uprooted from Chicago to rural Ireland, Maggie searches for her place in the country she now calls home before enduring a tragedy that sends her on a pilgrimage to fulfill her uncle’s request.

 

 

 

jungleGrasshopper Jungle, by Andrew Smith

Available in Print, Ebook, and Downloadable Audiobook.

“Austin Szerba narrates the end of humanity as he and his best friend Robby accidentally unleash an army of giant, unstoppable bugs and uncover the secrets of a decades-old experiment gone terribly wrong”– Provided by publisher.

 

 

summerThis One Summer, by Mariko Tamaki

Available in Print.

Rose and her parents have been going to Awago Beach since she was a little girl. It’s her summer getaway, her refuge. Her friend Windy is always there, too, like the little sister she never had, completing her summer family. But this summer is different. Rose’s mom and dad won’t stop fighting, and Rose and Windy have gotten tangled up in a tragedy-in-the-making in the small town of Awago Beach. It’s a summer of secrets and heartache, and it’s a good thing Rose and Windy have each other. (Graphic Novel).

Check out the YALSA Teen Book Finder App! YALSA’s Teen Book Finder is a free app to help teens, parents, librarians and library staff, educators, and anyone who loves YA literature access to the past three years’ of YALSA’s awards and lists on their smartphone.

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Read your favorite magazines online for free

Did you know that the library offers access to your favorite magazines online? Check out Zinio, the world’s largest newsstand. Zinio offers full color, interactive digital magazines for your enjoyment. Browse from your library’s collection of popular titles with no holds, no checkout periods, and no limit to the number of magazines you can download.

  • Mobile apps — Read magazines on 95% of today’s mobile devices including iOS (Apple), Android, Win8, and Kindle Fire/HD/HDX.
  • Current Issues — New issues are released simultaneously with the print edition. Many are available before they arrive at your library and are ready for immediate download.
  • Back List — As your collection grows, so does the digital backlist for anytime checkout and reading.
  • Easy browsing and checkout — Browse your library’s collection of titles one at a time, search for your favorite magazines by title or use the convenient category feature to find new magazines which meet your interests.
  • Manage your collection — Using the personal account you create, you will have the opportunity to checkout magazines and read them instantly on your computer (both PC and Mac) or access the content on a portable media device. (Note: viewing options, including the ability to download or view the content while online, may differ based on the device and/or magazine publisher).
  • No limit permanent check out — Check out as many issues as you want and keep them in your account as long as you wish
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Real Rad Reads Review: ALL THE BRIGHT PLACES BY JENNIFER NIVEN

brightAll the Bright Places

By: Jennifer Niven

Publication: January 6th, 2015

Genre(s): Contemporary, Realistic Fiction

Available in Print, E-book, and Downloadable Audiobook.

My rating: 5 stars

 

The Fault in Our Stars meets Eleanor and Park in this exhilarating and heart-wrenching love story about a girl who learns to live from a boy who intends to die. Soon to be a major motion picture starring Elle Fanning! 

Thedore Finch is fascinated by death, and he constantly thinks of ways he might kill himself. But each time, something good, no matter how small, stops him.   Violet Markey lives for the future, counting the days until graduation, when she can escape her Indiana town and her aching grief in the wake of her sister’s recent death. When Finch and Violet meet on the ledge of the bell tower at school, it’s unclear who saves whom. And when they pair up on a project to discover the “natural wonders” of their state, both Finch and Violet make more important discoveries: It’s only with Violet that Finch can be himself–a weird, funny, live-out-loud guy who’s not such a freak after all. And it’s only with Finch that Violet can forget to count away the days and start living them. But as Violet’s world grows, Finch’s begins to shrink.

This is an intense, gripping novel perfect for fans of Jay Asher, Rainbow Rowell, John Green, Gayle Forman and Jenny Downham from a talented new voice in YA, Jennifer Niven.

If you read any book this month, this year, in your life, make sure you read All the Bright Places.

It is beautiful. Heart-wrenching. Nitty gritty. Masterful. A pure must-read.

The topics All the Bright Places explores are heavy, hard, and thought-provoking. Teens and adults alike reading this novel will face the issues of mental illness, suicide, and grief inside the pages with the two main characters, Theodore Finch and Violet Markey.

I’m cutting to the chase, folks: I stayed up past midnight, crying myself to sleep while flipping through the last few pages of this book. It’s inevitable that you’ll cry. I can only count on one hand the books that have made my cry: In third grade, Marley and Me had the tears coming. If I StaySecond Chance Summer, and The Book Thief brought on the crying. All the Bright Places has the fifth spot on the list; the last book matched with my pinky when I count the small number of books that have made me cry.

I even saw a letter smudged with ink, and thought it was a stray tear (I held the book far away from my face that night so that no salty tears reached the bottom of the pages), but, after a few wipes and scratches, I realized that the book had come like that. From the tears that came from me, I think it’s fair of me to assume that was probably an editor or publisher crying over the book as they bound my version of the book. Sure, it’s probably most likely that the printer splotched some ink, but I’m going with the fun version of the story here.

To get to the point: I am so proud of Jennifer Niven for writing what she wrote. My first instinct after finishing ATBP was to send her an email that would only be able to convey a slice of my emotions, of how proud I was of her, about how grateful I am that she wrote the story she did. You go, Jennifer!

All the Bright Places tackles suicide and depression through the battles of both of our protagonists, Theodore and Violet. Theodore has always had a rough life, from abusive parents to his bipolar disorder. He has a habit of memorizing suicide facts and constantly thinking about death.

Check out the first line of All the Bright Places in Theodore Finch’s perspective:

“Is today a good day to die?

This is something I ask myself in the morning when I wake up. In third period when I’m trying to keep my eyes open while Mr. Schroeder drones on and on. At the supper table as I’m passing the green beans. At night when I’m lying awake because my brain won’t shut off due to all there is to think about.

Is today the day?

If not today—when?”

Violet Markey is drowning in her own grief over her sister’s tragic death, refusing to pick herself up and even attempt to be the girl she once was, feeling bad for being the only survivor in the car crash that left Eleanor, her sister dead.

“I wasn’t acting out. That wasn’t what it was. It’s just—I don’t cheer anymore. I quit student council. I suck at orchestra. I don’t have any friends or a boyfriend, because it’s not like the rest of the world stops, you know?” My voice is getting louder, and I can’t seem to do anything about it.

“Everyone goes on with their lives, and maybe I can’t keep up. Maybe I don’t want to.”

Pretty bleak quotes/feelings from those two, huh?

Well, the darkness inside both of these hurt people collides and burns into something bright and beautiful: a relationship.

Finch and Violet are paired up for a project where they have to “wander” Indiana. Besides being an educational experiences, during these “wanderings,” Violet and Finch find each other in the process, first becoming friends and then falling in love.

What I loved so much about this novel was that the characters: they were so flawed, funny, and endearing. Teenagers alike will fall in love with Finch, Violet and their story. Our society needs more books like this, books that highlight real problems of today and present them in a true light to readers. There’s not much else I can say, because All the Bright Places has so many beautiful moments, thoughts, and ideas expressed in every sentence, that I can’t even pinpoint anything, whether it’s a quote or moment that stands out in particular; everything made me cry, laugh, smile, and deeply examine my life. And, as a side note, being from the Midwest, I actually am only a few hours or even sometimes minutes away from some of the places explored in this book, and it taught me many things about my state. I might have to do some of my own wandering!

To sum up, All the Bright Places has earned a bright place in my heart. And it will earn one in yours.

Review by Mary Claire, Indy PL Teen

Real Rad Reads

Find me: Goodreads

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Review of Seconds: A Graphic Novel

secondsSeconds by Bryan Lee O’Malley with Jason Fischer, drawing assistant ; Dustin Harbin, lettering ; Nathan Fairbairn, color.

Available in Print.

Write down your mistake, eat a mushroom, go to sleep, wake up anew with your mistake erased. If it only it were that easy. First, the mushrooms are special. Second, the mistake must have taken place on the premises (in this case, the Seconds restaurant).

Katie is a talented young chef trying to open a second restaurant while not quite able to step aside at the first one – in other words, the staff thinks she’s bossy and wishes she would go away.  The construction on her new restaurant is not going smoothly, causing her much stress. In the middle of this, she starts seeing a strange girl sitting on her dresser in the room where she lives above the Seconds restaurant.

In the dresser, she finds a mushroom and the instructions to erase mistakes. An accident in the kitchen that burns one of the servers causes Katie to follow the instructions for a ‘revision’. A run-in with her ex-boyfriend prompts her to do it again. The mysterious girl on the dresser warns her that she is only entitled to use the power once, but life is full of mistakes so if you have a chance to correct them…

Needless to say, things get out of hand for Katie. What life does she really want for herself? Does she want her ex-boyfriend back? Does she want to renovate the old building for her new restaurant or should she have chosen the other one at better location?

The author/artist (who also gave us the Scott Pilgrim series) has created vibrant graphics to tell this intriguing story. The manga inspired characters inhabit wonderfully detailed panels that only add to the enjoyment of this story.

~Review by Will Smither, Indy PL Librarian and Teen Services Committee. You Know You Wanna Read It Blog.

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“We Love Our Libraries” with CEO Jackie Nytes

2015WeLoveOurLibraries400

The public is invited to meet with Library CEO Jackie Nytes and express their views about Library service in their community. A focus of the meeting is to gauge where individuals are on their personal digital journey. Joining the CEO will be the Library’s new Manager of Digitization, Meaghan Fukunaga, who will work to develop projects and community collaborations for the preservation and storage of items of local historic interest.

Check the schedule to see when Jackie Nytes, Indy PL CEO, will be visiting YOUR library! Can’t attend the meeting but would like to have a voice and share your views? Don’t worry, you can contact her here.

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