Read Right Now! No Mirrors in My Nana’s House

National African American Read-In
A Story Every Day: February 1-29, 2016

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No Mirrors in Nana's HouseStory of the Day:

Read Right Now! No Mirrors in Nana’s House by Synthia Saint James

A girl discovers the beauty in herself by looking into her Nana’s eyes. From Storyline Online. Read by Tia and Tamera Mowry.


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Free App – Riding With Rosa Parks

National African American Read-In
A Story Every Day: February 1-29, 2016

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Riding with Rosa ParksStory of the Day:

Free App – Riding with Rosa Parks

Read the Free App Riding With Rosa Parks – Readers will read about a period in American history when segregation laws denied African-American people equal rights. The story is told from the point of view of a fictitious character, Marissa, who witnesses the bravery Rosa Parks displayed when she refused to give up her seat on the bus.


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Read Right Now! Amazing Grace

National African American Read-In
A Story Every Day: February 1-29, 2016

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Amazing GraceStory of the Day:

Listen Right Now! Amazing Grace by Mary Hoffman

Grace loves stories, whether they’re in books or in movies or the kind her grandmother tells. She acts out the most exciting parts of all sorts of tales…sometimes Hiawatha, or Aladdin, of Joan of Arc…There’s nothing that Grace enjoys more.


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Listen Right Now! Brer Rabbit Stories

National African American Read-In
A Story Every Day: February 1-29, 2016

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Story of the Day:

Listen Right Now! Brer Rabbit Stories

Uncle Remus and Brer Rabbit

 

  • Listen to Brer Possum and the Snake – Storyteller Alice McGill performs her rendition of the folktale based on the stories by Joel Chandler Harris, author of Uncle Remus and other stories. Many of the Uncle Remus tales have been controversial for their negative stereotypes of blacks, yet are seen as important to the legacy of early black folk literature.
  • Listen to 11 Tales from Uncle Remus and Brer Rabbit – Uncle Remus’ stories feature a trickster hero called Br’er Rabbit (“Brother” Rabbit), who uses his wits to slide out of trouble and gain the advantage over the slower witted other animals, many of whom are trying to eat him. Br’er Rabbit stories were mostly collected directly from the afro-american oral story-telling tradition and are said to be a direct interpretation of Yoruba tales of Hare.

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Hoopla: eMusic, eMovies & eBooks for Kids

 

Hoopla Callout

Books, Music & Movies for your kids are available at the library. All you need to know is your library card number and PIN. What’s My Pin?

How Hoopla Music Works:

 

First, you will need to either register or login.

  • Click on “Log In” in the blue box in the upper right corner.
  • If you have already registered for hoopla, simply enter your email address and your password, then click log in.
  • If you haven’t registered, click on the Sign Up Now button in the center near the bottom of the page.
  • Click on your home library, in our case, that’s Indianapolis Public Library
  • Enter in your email address, create a hoopla password (not your email password!!), your Library Card number and your Library Card PIN. What’s My Pin?
  • Click Sign Up Now at the bottom of the page.
  • Congrats, you are signed up for hoopla!

 

Once you are logged into hoopla, you can checkout a total of 10 items each month from hoopla to either watch or listen to on your computer or mobile device.  You will be able to keep track of your limit by looking in the upper left hand corner of the webpage or the top of the app.  Your limit resets on the first of the month.

You can browse the material by format (music, movies, television) and search directly using the box at the top of the screen.

Once you find material that you like, you can click on the word Borrow and begin to watch the video or listen to the music immediately.   Videos will download to your device, so PLEASE make sure that you are on WiFi.   Downloads will incur data charges and movies are a larger format.  As soon as you click Borrow, you are charged for one checkout, even if you don’t watch or listen to the item.

Once you have checked out material, you will find them under My Titles at the top of the page when you log in next time.   Underneath each title is a counter telling you how long until the item is automatically returned to hoopla.   Movies are checked out for 72 hours and albums are checked out for 7 days.

The songs and movies stay on your device and are deleted automatically when their checkout time expires.  They have DRM (Digital Rights Management) and can’t be copied, downloaded to another app or given away.  Hoopla works on PCs, Macs, iOS devices and Android devices.  There are apps in both the App Store for iOS and the Play Store for Android.  Full details are here: under Supported Devices.

If you would like to see only content for kids when you are browsing Hoopla, or you want your kids to see only content for kids, you can make that selection in the Hoopla app under “Settings”. NOTE: This setting stays with the device, not the account. So if a parent enables “Kid’s Mode” on a child’s iPad, it’s set only for that iPad. If the child uses another device (like a PC), the parent will have to enable Kid’s Mode on that device, too.

Hoopla Kids

Enjoy!

Annie The Paper Bag Princess Madeline Spanish for Kids

Wordless Books

You might wonder what’s so great about a book without any words in it. Does it even qualify for a book if there are no words? With no words, isn’t it just pictures? The truth is, a wordless picture book tells a story without using words. The PICTURES have meaning. The ability to look at pictures and understand from them what is going on is an important skill for small children to practice. Looking at wordless picture books helps your child acquire several skills, even before he/she begins to recognize letters or words.

  • Comprehension – understanding the meaning of the pictures
  • A book is understood from left to right
  • Stories have a sequence
  • Inferring meaning – understanding what has just happened based on the picture – for example, a facial expression.
  • Predicting what will happen next
  • Vocabulary – yes, even without words a wordless picture book helps build vocabulary because the reader comes up with her own words, and when reading with a parent, hears the parent’s words that describe the same picture…but in different words. Instant vocabulary building!
  • Lastly, what great books for kids who have trouble with letters and words!

Websites:

Books:

Here are some favorite wordless books selected by Children’s Librarians at The Indianapolis Public Library. A picture really is worth a thousand words. Looking for more? Search our catalog under the subject “Stories without Words” to find other great wordless reads!

Ben's Dream Bluebird Chalk Draw! The Farmer and the Clown Flashlight Float Flora and the Flamingo Flora and the Penguin Flotsam Fox's Garden Freight Train Good Dog Carl Good Night Gorilla The Grey Lady and the Strawberry Snatcher Journey June 29 1999 Leaf Look Alikes Monster Book Mr Wuffles Museum Trip Pool The Red Book Quest The Secret Box Sidewalk Flowers The Snow Rabbit The Snowman Tuesday Uh-Oh Unspoken The Valentine Waterloo and Trafalgar Wave Where's Walrus and Penguin The White Book You Can't Take a Balloon Into the Metropolitan Museum You Can't Take a Balloon into the Museum of Fine Arts

Listen Right Now! Alfred Cralle

National African American Read-In
A Story Every Day: February 1-29, 2016

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Video Story of the Day:

Listen Right Now! Alfred Cralle

Alfred Cralle was an African-American inventor. In 1897 he received a patent for an ice cream scoop with a built in scraper so the scoop fell onto the cone or into the bowl. Read about more about African-American scientists & inventors.

 


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Listen Right Now! Suzan-Lori Parks

National African American Read-In
A Story Every Day: February 1-29, 2016

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Video Story of the Day:

Listen Right Now! Suzan-Lori Parks

Suzan-Lori Parks is the first African American woman to win the Pulitzer Prize (2002) for her play Topdog/Underdog. 

 


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Read Right Now! Harlem: a Poem

National African American Read-In
A Story Every Day: February 1-29, 2016

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HarlemStory of the Day:

Read Harlem a Poem by Walter Dean Myers

A poem celebrating the people, sights, and sounds of Harlem. Coretta Scott King Award Honor Book, 1998

 


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National African American Read-In

A Story Every Day

February 1-28, 2015

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Story of the Day:

Read Harlem: a Poem

by Walter Dean Myers illustrated by Christopher Myers

A poem celebrating the people, sights, and sounds of Harlem. 1998 Coretta Scott King Award Honor Book. #weneeddiversebooks


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Read Right Now! CONSTRUCTION

Print
Every Child Ready to Read® @ your library® is a program of the Association for Library Service to Children and Public Library Association, divisionsof the American Library Association. Every Child Ready to Read® @ your library® is a registered trademark and is used with permission. Early literacy begins at home with the adults in a child’s life.

Use IndyPL’s Read Right Now! pages to have fun at home doing the five things that build early reading skills: Reading, Playing, Writing, Singing & Talking. Find books to read, songs to listen to, games to play, crafts to make and more! Things you can do RIGHT NOW, at home – no waiting!


Reading
Time to Build a New Library Print Read Time to Build a New Library 

Tonka Chuck and Friends Tonka Logo Read Chuck & Friends Get to Work

Tools UniteForLiteracy75 Read Tools –  Choose to read the story in one of 13 languages! 

I Like Work Trucks UniteForLiteracy75 Read I Like Work Trucks –  Choose to read the story in one of 13 languages!

Building Our House Read Along Hoopla Logo Read Building Our House Read Along – Mom and Dad are going to make the new house themselves, from the ground up. From empty lot to finished home, every stage of their year-and-a-half-long building project is here. And at every step their lucky kids are watching and getting their hands dirty, in page after page brimming with machines, vehicles, and all kinds of house-making activities! (This title is from Hoopla…borrow it for free using your IndyPL Library Card number and PIN.)

More FREE Online Reading:


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Hard Workin Wheels Hoopla Logo Watch the Video: Hard Workin’ Wheels – A fun and interactive program bringing children to the job site to experience the sights and sounds of dump trucks, fire trucks, front loaders, excavators, cement mixers, top lifts and tractors. (This title is from Hoopla…borrow it for free using your IndyPL Library Card number and PIN.)

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Bob the Builder Connect the Dots Cement Mixer Tracer T is for Truck Tracer

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Freegal Headphones 150
Hoopla
Free eMusic to check out with your library card from Freegal & Hoopla. Directions

On the Go
Construction Sound Effects

 

Talking

The more words children hear, the more words they learn, the better prepared they are to read! Here are some tips for talking about letters:

Talk Letters

More Ways to Practice Talking:

Zero to Three: Tips on Learning to Talk


Building a Library:

Continue reading Read Right Now! CONSTRUCTION