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Tales of Holiday Cheer

December 8, 2014 by Reader's Connection

From Selector Emily Chandler:

Happy December, my favorite month of the year! Amidst the hustle and bustle of shopping and family time, there’s nothing like some quiet time cuddled up with a blanket, a warm beverage, and a new book to crack open. And, with all the fabulous titles published in the past few months, there is plenty to choose from. But, if you are of a mind to match your reading with the season, check out some of these new holiday reads!

 

The Nightingale Before Christmas: A Meg Langslow Mystery

 

Andrews, Donna The Nightingale Before Christmas: A Meg Langslow Mystery

 

 

 

Jane and the Twelve Days of Christmas

 

Barron, Stephanie Jane and the Twelve Days of Christmas: Being a Jane Austen Mystery

 

 

 

The Mistletoe Promise

 

Evans, Richard Paul The Mistletoe Promise

 

 

 

Winter Street

 

Hilderbrand, Elin Winter Street

 

 

 

Mr. Miracle

 

Macomber, Debbie Mr. Miracle: A Christmas Novel

 

 

 

The Christmas Wedding Ring

 

Mallery, Susan The Christmas Wedding Ring

 

 

 

Forever Christmas

 

Miller, Robert Tate Forever Christmas

 

 

 

A New York Christmas

 

Perry, Anne A New York Christmas

 

 

 

A Christmas Prayer

 

Roby, Kimberla Lawson A Christmas Prayer

 

 

 

The Greatest Gift: A Christmas Tale

 

Stern, Philip Van Doren The Greatest Gift: A Christmas Tale

 

 

An Island Christmas

 

Thayer, Nancy An Island Christmas

 

 

 

The Christmas Bouquet

 

Woods, Sherryl The Christmas Bouquet

 

 

 

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The world can’t end with the crime unsolved, that’s all there is to it.

December 5, 2014 by Reader's Connection

World of Trouble

Those words come from detective Hank Palace, on the last pages of World of Trouble, the concluding volume of The Last Policeman trilogy by Ben H. Winters.

The world is indeed coming to an end. An asteroid is going to crash into our planet and do us all in. But Palace can’t stop working on cases, and his present case involves a missing person, his sister Nico. He has left New England and come to Rotary, Ohio, in search of her.

While on his quest, Palace encounters clusters of people, here and there, coping in different ways with their coming end; and these little pockets of civilization (to use the word loosely) are fascinating, chilling, funny, quite moving.

Of course I’m going to turn this into a gift suggestion. Is there someone on your list who likes end-of-the-world tales, but hasn’t read the Hank Palace books? Or someone who loves mysteries? Winters has done a great job of blending these genres.

World of Trouble is also available as a downloadable e-book, and is on order as an audiobook on CD.

The year can’t end with the gift ungiven, that’s all there is to it.

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The Many Faces of A Christmas Carol

December 2, 2014 by Reader's Connection

A Christmas Carol From Selector Jessica Lawrence: The beloved holiday classic A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens has been considered a masterpiece since it was first published in 1843. In the 170 some years since it was first published, it has never been out of print and has been reimagined and reincarnated into many, many different versions and languages including numerous stage and film adaptations and even operas and ballets. It took Dickens under two months to write and publish, but it has endured for close to two centuries as a perennial holiday favorite. As you get ready to celebrate the holidays, check out some of the many film adaptations of A Christmas Carol listed below.

A Christmas Carol (1938)

 

A Christmas Carol (1938)

 

 

 

A Christmas Carol (2004)

 

A Christmas Carol (2004)

 

 

A Christmas Carol (1951)

A Christmas Carol (1951)

Hi, this is Glenn, the regular Reader’s Connection guy, invading Jessica’s blog post to say that if you’re only going to watch one version of A Christmas Carol in your life, it should be this 1951 version with Alastair Sim. Now back to Jessica.

A Christmas Carol (1999)

 

A Christmas Carol (1999)

A Christmas Carol (2012)

 

A Christmas Carol (2012)

 

 

 

A Christmas Carol (1997 animated)

 

A Christmas Carol (1997 animated)

 

 

 

A Christmas Carol (2009 animated)

 

A Christmas Carol (2009 animated)

 

 

 

A Diva’s Christmas Carol

 

A Diva’s Christmas Carol

 

 

 

A Flintstones’ Christmas Carol

 

A Flintstones’ Christmas Carol

 

 

 

An All Dogs Christmas Carol

 

An All Dogs Christmas Carol

 

 

 

An American Christmas Carol

 

An American Christmas Carol

 

 

 

Barbie in a Christmas Carol

 

Barbie in a Christmas Carol

 

 

 

Disney’s A Christmas Carol

 

Disney’s A Christmas Carol

 

 

 

Doctor Who: A Christmas Carol

 

Doctor Who: A Christmas Carol

 

 

 

Dora’s Christmas Carol Adventure

 

Dora’s Christmas Carol Adventure

 

 

 

Mickey’s Christmas Carol

 

Mickey’s Christmas Carol

 

 

 

Mr. Magoo’s Christmas Carol

 

Mr. Magoo’s Christmas Carol

 

 

 

Rich Little’s Christmas Carol and Robin Hood

 

Rich Little’s Christmas Carol and Robin Hood

 

 

 

Scrooge (1935)

 

Scrooge (1935)

 

 

 

Scrooge (1951)

Scrooge (1951)

Glenn again. I vouched above for the 1951 version of A Christmas Carol, and if all those copies are checked out, you may still be in luck. This 1951 Scrooge is the same movie, with its UK title and an intro by actor Patrick Macnee.

Scrooge (1970)

 

Scrooge (1970)

Scrooged

 

Scrooged

 

 

 

The Muppet Christmas Carol

 

The Muppet Christmas Carol

 

 

The Smurfs A Christmas Carol

 

The Smurfs A Christmas Carol

 

 

You can check out all of these titles and more at the Indianapolis Public Library!

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For anyone on your gift list who loved the Ken Burns series on the Roosevelts.

November 28, 2014 by Reader's Connection

The Mantle of Command: FDR at War, 1941-1942

Nigel Hamilton’s The Mantle of Command: FDR at War, 1941-1942 gives us an alternate version of Franklin Roosevelt as Commander-in-Chief. The traditional view, apparently, has FDR bumbling about, deferring to his military leaders and to Winston Churchill.

Hamilton will have none of that. His Roosevelt knows what he wants and how, realistically, to get there, navigating an isolationist USA (some of whose citizens are inspired by aviator-hero Charles Lindbergh’s anti-Semitic rants), and dealing with a Churchill who is obsessed with safeguarding the British Empire, even when such safeguarding works against the Allies, militarily.

The book finishes with Operation Torch, the November 1942 Allied invasion of northwest Africa, which, according to Hamilton, was a brilliant move opposed by almost all of FDR’s military leaders. I was delighted to read that this volume “will be followed by a concluding work.”

The Mantle of Command, which is going on my gift suggestion list, is also available as a downloadable e-book and an audiobook on CD.

2 related reads: Passages from Charles Lindbergh’s speeches reminded me that Philip Roth had written a novel in which Lindbergh was elected President, so I read that book and am recommending it in a new Staff Pick.. And on Monday, December 1st, the Wayne Library will host a discussion of Melanie Benjamin’s novel, The Aviator’s Wife, which gives a fictional account of the life of Anne Morrow Lindbergh.

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Our newest digital collection: pages from the library’s history

November 26, 2014 by Reader's Connection

Broad Ripple Branch boys moving books
I love this picture of kids moving books into the new Broad Ripple Branch in 1949. Is this how we moved stuff around, back then?

I love it because the guys are cute, because I learn from it that Broad Ripple students were already called Rockets in 1949, because I actually remember this branch (which closed when the new BR branch opened in Broad Ripple Park in 1986, only to move east in 2000 and become the Glendale Branch), and because I’ve been able to shrink the picture down and fit it into the blog.

Lots of the photos in our newest digital collection, the Lawrence J. Downey Library History Collection, are too big for me to import here. You’ll need to look at them in the collection.


Example: my severely cropped photo of the Riley Room for Children at Central Library in 1924. Click on it to see the whole photo in the Downey collection. When I’ve opened it, there, I can grab it an scoot it around.

 
wideners2And I can widen the frame with these arrows.

Wasn’t the whole photo much more fun? To get to our digital collections, go to the block on our home page that says The Resources, and click on Digital Collections. (For the time being, you can click on this picture.)

Scroll down through our digital library’s holdings and select the Downey Collection.
downey_scroll2

 

There are documents galore. Click below to go to Arthur E. Bostwick’s speech at the dedication of Central Library in 1917. All twelve pages are here!

 

Or click below to see a letter from Director Marian McFadden to staff at the end of World War II. Only two pages.

 

If you have memories of the library, or are just curious, you can enter a search term . . .
emerson_search2

 

. . . and see what you find.

 

I need to say that Mr. Downey was a long-time library administrator, a gentleman and a scholar, and the author of A Live Thing in the Whole Town: The History of the Indianapolis-Marion County Public Library, 1873-1990. Click on the title to go to that book in our catalog, or click on the cover to see the book digitally.

Yes, the 1924 photo of the Riley Room is in Mr. Downey’s book. It’s also in S. L. Berry’s book Stacks: A History of the Indianapolis-Marion County Public Library. But I had never experienced the picture, completely, until I saw it digitally.
 
I hope you enjoy this new addition to our ever-expanding digital library. And I hope you have a Happy Thanksgiving.

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