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The Man Booker Prize for Fiction, 2013

September 14, 2013 by Reader's Connection

This just in from Susanne–

The short list of six finalists for the Man Booker Prize has been announced. Just as readers traditionally look forward to the annual naming of the Pulitzer Prize winner, more and more people are looking toward the Man Booker list as a source of excellent fiction titles.

According to the website of the Booker Prize Foundation, the prize ”aims to promote the finest in fiction by rewarding the best novel of the year written by a citizen of the United Kingdom, the Commonwealth or the Republic of Ireland.”

Although a recent favorite of mine did not make the cut from the longlist to the shortlist (Colum McCann’s Transatlantic, highly recommended) these six remaining titles represent an astounding variety of settings, eras, and viewpoints. Check them out and choose your favorite before the award is announced on October 15.

 

We Need New Names by NoViolet Bulawayo (http://novioletbulawayo.com/)

We Need New Names

A ten year-old girl from Zimbabwe tells a tale of challenging times in her native land and equally challenging times once she moves to America.

 

 

The Luminaries by Eleanor Catton http://grantabooks.com/Eleanor-Catton

The Luminaries

In 1860’s New Zealand, fortune hunters, checkered pasts, and mysterious characters are brought together by the lure of a gold rush.

(Stay tuned to this blog. Glenn, the usual Reader’s Connection guy, just finished reading The Luminaries, yesterday, and he’s excited.) 

 

Harvest by Jim Crace (http://www.jim-crace.com/)

Harvest

Fire comes to a small English village on the day after the harvest. Crace slowly and carefully reveals how the flames reflect the old, simple way of life as it transitions into the new, industrialized way of life which is looming on the horizon.

 

 

The Lowland by Jhumpa Lahiri (http://www.randomhouse.com/kvpa/jhumpalahiri/)

The Lowland

Two brothers from Calcutta come of age during the 1960’s – one moves to the US, one takes a revolutionary path in India, but fate reunites them in ways that effect their family for generations.

 

 

A Tale for the Time Being by Ruth Ozeki (http://www.ruthozeki.com/)

A Tale for the Time Being

Tales from past and present are contained within a box that washes ashore along the Pacific coast. Ozeki’s trademark style weaves together humor, myth, and a personal view of Japanese social history over the span of several generations.

 

 

The Testament of Mary by Colm Tóibín (http://www.colmtoibin.com/)

TITLE

In Tóibín’s concise, powerful novella, Mary, the mother of Jesus, resists sharing her experiences from the time of the Crucifixion, as she feels that her son’s death may have been in vain.

 

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