Tag Archives: Sports

Amazing Olympic Athlete Wilma Rudolph

Amazing Olympic Athlete Wilma Rudolph

Amazing Olympic Athlete Wilma Rudolph

Wilma Rudolph had polio when she was six years old. Polio is a virus that can cause paralysis. Now we have a vaccine for polio but that wasn’t invented yet when Wilma was little. The polio did not paralyze Wilma, but it did leave one leg crooked and Wilma had to wear a brace to help her walk.

When Wilma was nine she took the brace off and when she was eleven she started to play sports in school. Eventually, Wilma won gold medals at the Olympics as a runner. For the next two weeks you can watch the stories of Olympic athletes at the 2010 Vancourver Winter Olympic games. Lots of them will have inspirational stories too. It takes a lot of hard work and determination to compete at the Olympic Level.

Take a look at this great video of Wilma talking about her own life and her experiences at the Olympics.

oscar-robertson

Have you ever heard of Indiana’s own Olympian Oscar Robertson? In 1955 Oscar when to Crispus Attucks High School. Oscar’s team won the Indiana State Championship, becoming the first all-black school in the nation to win a state title. Robertson led Crispus Attucks to another championship in 1956. Oscar was so good he played in College and went on to win a gold medal with the US Basketball team at the 1960 Olympic Games.

If you are following the Vancouver Winter Olympics this month – try out some of these sites:

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The Brooklyn Nine

The Brooklyn Nine

The Brooklyn Nine Felix plays in 1854 and likes the New York Knickerbockers. Louis is a soldier during the Civil War and plays ball between battles. Arnold is a fan in 1894 and gets to meet his favorite player. Walter is a batboy for the Brooklyn Superbas in 1908. Frankie does a little betting on the game in 1926. Kat, a girl, plays for the Grand Rapids Chicks in 1945. Jimmy can’t believe it when he finds out the Dodgers are leaving Brooklyn in 1957. Michael just might pitch a perfect game in 1981. Snider turns baseball memorabelia into dollars on e-bay in 2002. Nine innings in a baseball game, nine kids in this story told in nine chapters…one chapter for each kid. The nine kids have baseball in common and something else, something really important…but you’ll have to get to the last chapter to find out what it is. TIP: Pay attention to the bat and the ball. Each chapter is a story itself but the way the author ties it all together at the end is really cool! Author: Allan Gatz Look

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The Girl Who Threw Butterflies

The Girl Who Threw Butterflies

The Girl Who Threw Butterflies

Molly’s a pitcher. Her eighth grade year she does something a little different. She tries out for the boys baseball team instead of the girl’s softball team. When she shows up for try-outs, Molly brings her secret weapon, a weapon that comes as a suprise to the other boys trying out as well as her coaches. Molly can throw a floating knuckleball (a butterfly).  And she can throw it hard.

But this story is about much more than a girl trying out for a usually all-boys team. Boys’ baseball isn’t the only thing different about Molly’s eighth grade year. This year, she has to learn how to do everything, including baseball, without her Dad, who died in a car accident before the school year began. Molly’s Mom is barely holding it together herself, which is hard, because now it’s like Molly’s lost both parents.

Molly is pretty honest about how she feels about her Mom. At one point Molly imagines telling her, “I love you and all that, but right now everything about you bothers me.” And it isn’t that Molly doesn’t love her Mom, it’s that her Mom isn’t her Dad, and the Mom she once knew is now different. The best part about this book is how intensely honest Molly is. She also has a best friend, Celia, who is the same way and is the only person Molly knows who still treats her like Molly, not like “Miss Difficulty Overcome.” It’s Celia that keeps Molly talking about her feelings so that she can deal with them. It’s Celia that nudges Molly and her Mom toward each other again.

To make the story even better, the baseball part is realistic – the boys are competitive and the games are intense. Some of the boys are not happy at all about Molly making the team. When Lonnie steps forward to give Molly  someone to pitch to, he turns out to be a really good friend too. Author: Mick Cochrane

If you like Molly’s story, here are some more about kids coming to terms with changes, sometimes using sports to help them cope and sometimes just leaning on a good friend:
My Thirteenth Season Confetti Girl Umbrella Summer Top of the Order

 

 

Celia and Lonnie

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Indy 500

Indy 500

Indy Racing It’s almost race day. Try some of these websites to find out what’s going on during race weekend and to test your racing skills online.

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We Are the Ship – Coretta Scott King Author Award 2009

We Are the Ship – Coretta Scott King Author Award 2009

I told you about this book a few months ago already, but since it just won the Coretta Scott King Award, I thought I would show it to you again. It is great words and great pictures together -the perfect book!

I’m not really into baseball very much and I loved this book! It is the story of Negro League baseball. Did you know that there was a league in the 1920s, 1930s and 1940s for African-American players because they were not allowed to play in the Major Leagues? This book is the story of those players and the league they made great that only came to an end when Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier in Major League baseball. The story is told like you are listening to an old player remember. The narrator tells about how the league was formed, who the owners, managers and players were…but more. The narrator doesn’t just list the facts. There are many sad, surprising, horrifying, funny & interesting stories about the players and what they endured to play baseball. On top of that, the pictures in the book are astounding! The author/artist, Kadir Nelson, did a lot of reasearch to get the ballparks and players, uniforms and other details just right. It is like looking at painted photos from someone who was actually there. This is a good one. Don’t miss it. Author: Kadir Nelson

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