Tag Archives: Social Studies

Homework Help: Native Americans

Homework Help: Native Americans

First PeopleBefore the European conquest, North America was home to more than 300 Native American tribes. Each of them has its own history, art, culture and traditions. This illustrated history book will show you many of them. It includes maps, charts and timelines too to help you with homework questions about particular groups. Listed below are more websites and books to help you do research.

Listed below are books, websites & databases that will help you learn about Native Americans. To give you a start looking at what their life was like, you can look at some images like this one of Native American items that are Artifacts at The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis.

Cradleboard – “Native American mothers, aunts, and grandmothers demonstrated their love and hope for infants by creating elaborately decorated cradle covers or cradleboards. They used beads, pain, wood, or tacks to make special carriers for their infants. Mothers carried their babies in the cradleboards, like this one, or strapped it to the side of a horse. It was easy to prop the cradleboard with the infant near a tree or dwelling while the mother performed daily chores. Many elders believed cradleboards “socialized” infants when worn because it brought the child to the eye level of the adults.” More Native American Artifacts at The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis.


Websites, Activities & Printables:

US History in Context Logo

U.S. History in Context: Native Americans is a database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home with your IndyPL Library Card. Login using your library card number and PIN. What’s My PIN? It will show you biographies, magazines, videos and more about Native Americans.​

 

Novelist K-8 Logo

NoveList K-8: Stories about Native Americans is a database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home with your IndyPL Library Card. Login using your library card number and PIN. What’s My PIN? Novelist will show you fiction chapter books and picture books you can read about Native Americans. Click on “Check the Library Catalog” to see if IndyPL has the book.


Indiana Books & WebsitesFocus on Indiana:

The Miami, Potawatomi, Kickapoo, Mascoutens, Delaware (Lenape), Shawnee were some of the Native Americans that lived in Indiana before settlers came here. One of the most well-known Native Americans from Indiana is the Miami Chief, Little Turtle. The websites and books below will help you learn more about Native Americans who lived in Indiana.

The MiamisSalt

eBooks:

IndyPLLibraryCard100
Use your indyPL Library Card number and PIN to check out FREE Online eBooks. Click on a book jacket & enter your Library Card number and PIN to borrow. What’s My PIN?Overdrive

Bones on the GroundThe Rough Face GirlThe Porcupine YearThe Legend of the Indian PaintbrushThe Legend of the BluebonnetSequoyahMore Than MoccasinsMakoonsIf You Lived With the Iroquois

Print Books:

Before ColumbusBuckskin Dresses and Pumpkin BreechesChildren of the TipiExplore Native American CulturesExploring the Life, Myth and Art of Native AmericansHiawatha and the PeacemakerLooks Like Daylight Voices of Indigenous KidsNative American Heroes Native American MythologyNative Americans a Visual ExplorationHands on History Native AmericansRed CloudTecumsehUndefeated Jim ThorpeU-X-L Encyclopedia of Native American TribesBuffalo Bird GirlCrossing Bok ChittoGhost HawkPaiute PrincessThe Birchbark HouseThe Legend of Lightning and ThunderThe Man Who Dreamed of Elk DogsThe Story of Jumping MouseThe Woman Who Lived with the Wolves
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15 Kids’ Classics Then (1917) and Now (2017)

15 Kids’ Classics Then (1917) and Now (2017)

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum was originally published in 1900. When Central Library opened in 1917 this is what the book looked like then. After more than 100 years it is still a favorite! It’s a classic. That means it has stayed popular for a long time. 100 years is definitely a long time! Listed below are 15 classic children’s books that were on the library shelves in 1917 and are still favorites on the library shelves in 2017.

The book covers on the left show you what the books looked like in 1917. Click on one of the old book jackets to read the book online. You don’t even need to wait to check it out. These books are part of the public domain. Public domain means that since these books were published before 1923, they are not subject to copyright. That means you can read them for free!

The book covers on the right show you what the books look like today. Click on one of these newer versions to see it in the computer catalog. You can place a hold there with your library card if you would like to read it. For most of the newer versions just the cover and maybe the illustrations have changed, but for some of them the story has been changed a little to either reflect the times or tell the story in a new way. Try Matt Phelan’s Snow White. It’s a graphic novel version that is really good!

You can find even MORE classic books for kids to read for free at indyPL Kids’: Staying Power – 50 Classic Kids’ Books,  Read.gov: Classic Books and at The International Children’s Digital Library.


The Adventures of Tom SawyerThe Adventures of Tom SawyerThe Adventures of Tom Sawyer – Tells the adventures and pranks of a mischievous boy growing up in a Mississippi River town in the early nineteenth century.


Aesop's FablesAesop's FablesAesop’s Fables – Aesop’s wise, witty and timeless fables. The version on the right sets the fables in an African setting.


Alice's Adventures in WonderlandAlice's Adventures in WonderlandAlice’s Adventures in Wonderland – Offers the classic tale about a young girl who goes on a fantastical trip after falling into a deep hole where she meets a cast of weird and wonderful creatures along the way.


Anne of Green GablesAnne of Green GablesAnne of Green Gables – Anne, an eleven-year-old orphan, is sent by mistake to live with a lonely middle-aged brother and sister on a Prince Edward Island farm and proceeds to make an indelible impression on everyone around her.

 


 

CinderellaCinderellaCinderella – In her haste to flee the palace before the fairy godmother’s magic loses effect, Cinderella leaves behind a glass slipper.


HeidiHeidiHeidi – A Swiss orphan is heartbroken when she must leave her beloved grandfather and their happy home in the mountains to go to school and to care for an invalid girl in the city.

 


 

The Jungle BookThe Jungle BookThe Jungle Book – An anthology of stories chronicles the adventures of Mowgli, a young boy raised by wolves, as he learns the ways of the jungle from Baloo the bear and matches wits with his archenemy, Shere Khan, in a collection that also includes the tale of Rikki-tikki-tavi.


The Little PrincessA Little PrincessA Little Princess – Alone in a new country, wealthy Sara Crewe tries to make friends at boarding school and settle in. But when she learns that she’ll never see her beloved father again, her life is turned upside down. Transformed from princess to pauper, she must swap dancing lessons and luxury for drudgery and a room in the attic. Will she find that kindness and generosity are all the riches she truly needs?


PinocchioPinocchioPinocchio – The adventures of a talking wooden puppet whose nose grows whenever he tells a lie.


The Secret GardenThe Secret GardenThe Secret Garden – A ten-year-old orphan comes to live in a lonely house on the Yorkshire moors where she discovers an invalid cousin and the mysteries of a locked garden.

 


 

Snow WhiteSnow WhiteSnow White – The story of a beleaguered girl who finds shelter with seven dwarves after the sudden death of her father and suffering cruelty at the hands of her stepmother.


The Story of the Three PigsThe Story of the Three PigsThree Little Pigs – The three pigs and their narrow escape of the wolf.


Through the Looking GlassThrough the Looking GlassThrough the Looking Glass – In this sequel to “Alice in Wonderland” Alice goes through the mirror to find a strange world where curious adventures await her.


The Wind in the WillowsThe Wind in the WillowsThe Wind in the Willows – The escapades of four animal friends who live along a river in the English countryside–Toad, Mole, Rat, and Badger.

 


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Homework Help: U.S. States

Homework Help: U.S. States

More Homework Help

 

State Names, Seals, Flags, and Symbols is all that and more. The title of this book could also have included, mottoes, capitols, flowers, birds, trees, sports teams, fairs and more. It is a one stop shop for factual details about each state. Listed below are more eBooks, Books, websites to help you write state reports for social studies.

“This Indiana State Flag rode into space with Hoosier astronaut Joe Allen during his November 1982 mission on the Columbia shuttle. Why do you think states have flags? Do you know the history of the Indiana state flag? To celebrate the 100th anniversary of the state of Indiana, the Daughters of the American Revolution sponsored a competition to create a state flag. Respected Hoosier artist Paul Hadley of Mooresville submitted the winning design. In 1917 the Indiana General Assembly adopted his design.” 

More Indiana Artifacts at The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis


Websites:

Culture Grams States Edition Logo

Culture Grams: States Edition is a database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home with your IndyPL Library Card. Login using your library card number and PIN. What’s My PIN? Choose a state to find up-to-date information for reports including: state symbols, climate, geography, economy, history, population, government, famous people, sports teams, & recipes.


eBooks:

IndyPLLibraryCard100
Use your indyPL Library Card number and PIN to check out FREE Online eBooks and eVideos. Click on a book jacket & enter your Library Card number and PIN to borrow. What’s My PIN?Overdrive

The Midwest and Great Lakes RegionThe Scary States of AmericaThe Scrambled States of America

Print Books:

50 States Our AmericaNational Geographic Beginner's United States AtlasDK State by State AtlasExplore the USA with 50 Fun Filled MapsGreat Lakes States CraftsOur 50 States a Family Adventure Across AmericaNational Geographic Our Fifty States The Handy State by State Answer BookUltimate US Road Trip AtlasUnited Tweets of AmericaUS Geography Through Infographics
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Central Library 100 Years Ago

Central Library 100 Years Ago

Construction began on Central Library in 1916. A cornerstone laying ceremony took place on March 24th. A cornerstone is a corner block in a building’s foundation that is often ceremonial. Many cornerstones include an inscription of the construction dates of the building. Another tradition is putting a time capsule in a cornerstone. A time capsule is a box that contains a selection of objects chosen to be typical of the present time and then buried for opening in the future. Central Library’s cornerstone had a time capsule in it that is 100 years old! We opened it! What do you think was inside?

On the day of Central Library’s cornerstone laying many Indianapolis citizens and community leaders gathered for a celebration. Children convened at Shortridge High School before marching down the street to sing “The Messiah of Nations” to mark the event. “The Messiah of Nations” is a song written by American composer John Philip Sousa. The lyrics to the song were written by Indiana’s own James Whitcomb Riley. If you play the piano or like to sing, you can print a copy of the sheet music from The Library of Congress.

Central Library opened its doors in October 1917. When children entered through the doors on St. Clair Street they walked through the Riley penny gates. These gates were paid for by pennies donated by the children themselves. Once inside, children headed to a space designed just for them called the Riley Room. This room was named to honor James Whitcomb Riley. Riley was a Hoosier who wrote many poems for children and also donated the land Central Library is built on. If you enter Central Library through the doors on St. Clair Street today, you will still walk through the Riley penny gates! The Riley Room for Children was well used and loved as you can see in these old photographs but that space is not used for children anymore. Today Central Library has a space designed specifically for children called the Learning Curve. 

What are some of the biggest differences between children using the library today, and children using the library in the 1920s? How many differences can you spot between the Children’s Room in 1917 and the Learning Curve in 2017?

Librarian’s jobs have changed a great deal since Central Library opened in 1917. Below is a photo of a librarian’s desk at Central Library around 1917. Today librarians use computers, help people check out electronic books, and use the electronic databases to help answer questions over chat. What do you see on this librarian’s desk that could give you a clue about how he/she would have helped someone find the answer to a question in 1917? How might a patron have gotten in touch with this librarian to ask a question?

Today if you want to find a book, you probably use our online catalog. But when Central Library opened you would have walked up to a huge card catalog, pulled out a drawer, and looked up information on index cards. You can still see a card catalog at the Indiana 

State 
Library, complete with the cards. The picture below is of Central’s card catalog in 1917. Do you think this method was easier or harder than how you find a book today? Have you ever used a card catalog?

Even though many things have changed about being a librarian over the last 100 years, some things have remained basically the same. Have you ever seen one of these in a library? Librarians still use book carts today for all manner of things – to move books around, to temporarily store books, and even for displays.

 

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Homework Help: Explorers

Homework Help: Explorers

More Homework Help

 

Do you think you have what it takes to be a trailblazer? In the Ultimate Explorer Guide, follow along as modern day explorers unearth ancient mummies, encounter wild animals and use the latest technologies in space travel. This book features explorers of all kinds: paleontologists, biologists, photographers, artists, conservationists, and more. 

An explorer is someone who investigates the unknown or unfamiliar in order to learn about it. The unknown can be geographic (a place) or it can be an experience or idea. Because they go where others haven’t, geographic explorers are often associated with certain personality traits like bravery, confidence and curiosity. Their adventures make great stories!

There are many well known explorers from history, especially from the period know as the age of exploration when the earth was not fully explored or mapped yet. This was the time of Columbus, de Soto, Magellan and many more. In the following centuries humans added the exploration of space. The first space explorers are well known too – Armstrong, Glenn, Shepard & Aldrin.

Use the resources on this page to learn about the explorers of the past as well as those today who continue to discover new frontiers on earth and beyond. You can also learn about the tools and technologies explorers have used to help them navigate to new and unexplored places.

The device on the right is called an octant. It is an Artifact at The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis. “An octant is a navigational tool that is similar to a sextant. It was used mostly to determine latitude at sea. It measures angles by observing the sun or stars and the horizon in reflecting mirrors. It is called an octant because the maximum angle it can measure is one-eighth of a circle, or 45°. This octant was made around 1800.”


Websites, Activities & Printables:

World History in Context LogoWorld History in Context: Age of Exploration is a database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home with your IndyPL Library Card. Login using your library card number and PIN. What’s My PIN? World History in Context will show you biographies, magazines, videos and more about explorers.

 

Biography in Context: Explorers is another database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home with your IndyPL Library Card. Login using your library card number and PIN. What’s My PIN? Biography in Context will show you biographies, magazines, videos and more about world explorers. Pick a name from their list to learn more about that explorer.​


IndyPLLibraryCard100Use your indyPL Library Card number and PIN to check out FREE Online eBooks. Click on a book jacket & enter your Library Card number and PIN to borrow. What’s My PIN?Overdrive Logo

eBooks:

Lives of the Explorers Book JacketThe Quest for Z Book JacketI Columbus Book Jacket

Print Books:

Who Was First Book JacketEyewitness Explorer Book JacketAlexander the Great Book JacketAmerican Archaeology Uncovers Vikings Book JacketColumbus Book JacketDown the Colorado Book JacketExploration and Discovery Book JacketExplore the Most Dangerous Journeys of All TimeExplore with Lewis and Clark Book JacketWomen Explorers Book JacketExplorers Book JacketInto the West Book JacketMarco Polo Book JacketSylvia Earle Ocean Explorer Book JacketThe Plant Hunters Book JacketZheng He the Great Chinese Explorer Book JacketByrd and Igloo Book JacketA World of Her Own Book JacketConquistadors Book Jacket
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