Tag Archives: Non-Fiction

The Girl from the Tar Paper School

The Girl from the Tar Paper School

Mr. Ferris and his Wheel

Describes the peaceful protest organized by teenager Barbara Rose Johns in order to secure a permanent building for her segregated high school in Virginia in 1951, and explains how her actions helped fuel the civil rights movement.

Websites:

Books:

 

The Story of the Little Rock Nine Separate is Never Equal The Lions of Little Rock Ruby Bridges Goes to School
Remember The Power of One Through My Eyes
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Stubby the War Dog

Stubby the War Dog

Mr. Ferris and his Wheel

American soldier J. Robert Conroy befriended a stray dog with a stumpy tail while training to fight overseas in WWI. They bonded so closely that Conroy smuggled him to Europe, where Stubby accompanied Conroy’s regiment on the Western Front, lending both his superior olfactory senses and amiable temperament to the war effort.

Conroy kept a scrapbook for Stubby. This book is FULL of great photos from it as well as remembrances from the people who were Stubby’s friends. Dog is definitely man’s best friend. Loyal with a capital “L”.

Websites:

Military Animals:

Animals at War Navy Seal Dogs Sea Lions in the Navy Combat Wounded Dogs
Rags Hero Dog of World War I Soldiers Dogs Stubby the Dog Soldier Military Dolphins
War Dogs Dogs on Duty Nubs

Military Animal Stories:

Caesar the War Dog Operation Blue Dragon Duke Dog Tags Prisoner of War Dog Tags Semper Fido
Dog Tags Strays Dogs of War Soldier Dog The Donkey of Gallipoli
Darling Mercy Dog of World War I Fly Cher Ami Fly Bunny the Brave War Horse

World War I:

50 Things World War I Voices of World War I Women Heroes of World War I The Sinking of the Lusitania
Harlem Hellfighters Treaties Trenches Mud and Blood Archie's War Truce the Day the Soldiers Stopped Fighting
Shooting at the Stars The War to End All Wars Wordl War I For Kids War Game
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Mr. Ferris and His Wheel

Mr. Ferris and His Wheel

Mr. Ferris and his Wheel

Completed in 1889 for the World’s Fair, France’s Eiffel Tower was the world’s tallest man-made structure at 986 feet. Organizers of the next World’s Fair, in 1893 in Chicago, were under a lot of pressure to build something so impressive, so they held a contest to see who could come up with the best idea.

The winner was George Ferris, a steel expert who had a crazy idea…his structure would MOVE. This book is the story of how George built his enormous wheel. George was under a very tight deadline. Four months. In Chicago. During the winter! He really only had one chance to get it right.

Have you ever heard the phrase, “measure twice, cut once”? My Dad used to say that when he was working with wood. It means you should double-check your measurements and design for accuracy…because if you make a mistake you waste time and materials because you have to do it again. George did not have any time to waste and could not afford even a single mistake. The whole project is an amazing story of precision and teamwork. George’s Ferris wheel was assembled from over 100,000 separate parts from more than a dozen different steel mills. Correctly made parts arrived at the building site in the right order and were put together “like a giant Lego toy.” Amazing. Some men have the brains and the guts to dream big.

Make no little plans; they have no magic to stir men’s minds.”
~Daniel H. Burnham, American architect and construction chief of the 1893 World’s Fair

Websites:

Books:

Who Invented the Ferris Wheel George Ferris and his Amazing Invention George Ferris What a Wheel Roller Coasters
Amazing Amusement Park Rides Water Rides Ferris Wheels Carousels
Exciting Entertainment Inventions Fast Facts Roller Coasters
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The Mad Potter George E. Ohr Eccentric Genius

The Mad Potter George E. Ohr Eccentric Genius

George E. Ohr was a potter from Biloxi Mississippi. He’s been dead for a long time – he was a little boy during the U.S.Civil War. Even so, when you read about him, it seems like you could just walk into his studio and start making stuff out of clay with him. He doesn’t seem old-fashioned or distant. He seems like a friend. He called his pots his “mud babies”. As you can see by his picture on the cover of this book – George was one-of-a-kind. There is another picture of him in this book with his mustache sticking straight out on both sides and his eyes crossed. This is a man who listened to his own voice and nobody else’s. Some of the words people used to describe him were:

  • scallywag
  • rascal
  • braggart
  • clown

But he was more than that. He was also a genius, and an artist. The picture of the pots he made are amazing. They are one-of-a-kind also, just like George.

This book is the story of George’s life from the time he was a boy helping in his father’s blacksmith shop or his mother’s grocery store, to the time he spent digging up natural clay along the banks of the Mississippi to make into his “mud babies”. If you have ever felt like the oddball, the one whose ideas don’t seem quite in step with everyone else, you’ll like George’s story. Reading about how he believed in himself makes you feel confident enough to do the same. If George was “mad” he was the good kind!


Websites:


Books:

Dave the Potter The Pot That Juan Built Super Simple Clay Projects Decorated Pottery
Easy Clay Crafts in 5 Steps The Kids N Clay Ceramics Book A Single Shard
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Elections

Elections

Websites

Indiana Websites

 

Voting Machine

Thousands of Marion County, Indiana residents voted at this machine between the 1930s and the 1980 election.

Voting Machine 2

During this time, many African Americans struggled to gain the civil rights Caucasian men and women enjoyed. Even though the 15th Amendment granted all American citizens the right to vote regardless of “race, color or previous condition of servitude,” African Americans still struggled for the right to vote particularly in the southern United States. In Indiana, African Americans continued to work for equal rights welcoming two significant federal laws, the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voter Rights Act of 1965, helped to ensure African Americans the right to vote. Artifacts at the Children’s Museum of Indianapolis 

See More Elections Artifacts from the Children’s Museum of Indianapolis’ Collection

Books about Elections

Election Day Getting Elected Presidential Races Voting
The 15th Amendment Womens Right to Vote

Stories about Elections

Big Nate Mr. Popularity Caste Your Ballot The Ellie McDoodle Diaries Ellie for President I Am a Genius of Unspeakable
The Kid Who Ran for President The Misfits

 

 

 

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