Tag Archives: Indiana

Marshall “Major” Taylor

Marshall “Major” Taylor

Marshall

This is the story of a young African-American boy who grew up in Indianapolis over a hundred years ago. Despite living at a time when African-Americans were often denied basic rights, Marshall Taylor became a world champion cyclist.

Marshall earned the nickname “Major” when he performed bicycle tricks as a very young boy dressed in a military style costume. When he was a teenager he stopped performing tricks and moved on to bicycle racing – and he was really, really good – world champion good! His story is inspiring because he persevered even when there were many people who didn’t want him to even be in a race, let alone win, just because he was African-American. Sometimes he rode fast just to get away from angry people chasing him! Author: Marlene Targ Brill

In Indianapolis, we have the Major Taylor Velodrome, a world-class bicycle racing track named for this cycling great. You can ride your bike and also use inline skates at the Velodrome. If you want to try riding there, it’s best if you are at least 10 years old. Call ahead and see if you can arrange a time to go try it out. And don’t forget your helmet! 3649 Cold Spring Rd., Indianapolis, IN 46222 Velodrome Phone: 317-327-8356

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Indiana’s 28th Regiment & Tuskegee Airmen

Indiana’s 28th Regiment & Tuskegee Airmen
28th-colored-troops-photo
Photo courtesy of the Indiana Historical Society.
Indiana’s first black troops in the Civil War were enlisted in November 1863. More than eight hundred black men joined the Twenty-eighth Regiment. The regiment trained at Camp Fremont near Fountain Square in Indianapolis. The regiment is best known for its role in the siege of Petersburg, Virginia, where on July 30, 1864, it participated in the Battle of the Crater. In this battle, Union troops dug a tunnel under the Confederate fort at Petersburg, carried eight thousand pounds of explosives into the tunnel, and blew up the fort. When the war was over the soldiers returned to Indianapolis on January 6, 1866. The regiment lost 212 men in battle or as a result of disease.

Tuskegee Airmen were African-American pilots who flew in World War II. Before the Tuskegee Airmen, no African-American pilots had every been in the U.S. armed forces. They were the first and became highly regarded airmen. They are best known for escorting bombers. In this video you can watch some Hoosier airmen talk about their experiences during the war.

  • Tuskegee Airmen Official Website
  • Tuskegee Airmen at Huntington, Indiana Airport Part 2
  • Tuskegee Airmen at Huntington, Indiana Airport Part 3
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The Beef Princess of Practical County

The Beef Princess of Practical County

The Beef Princess of Practical County

12 year-old Libby lives in Practical County, Indiana. (Not a real Indiana County – but it could be.) She lives on her family’s cattle farm and is excited to be old enough to choose two calves to raise for her County Fair. She chooses the calves in September. Her job is to raise the calves herself all year and then choose one to show at the Fair the next summer. Having the winning cow at the Fair would bring a lot of pride to her family, and also a good amount of money to her college fund at the post Fair cattle auction.

Even though the calves she names Piggy (eats alot)and Mule (really stubborn) are a lot of work, Libby falls in love with them, especially, Piggy, who is affectionate and frisky. Libby’s dad warns her that she shouldn’t name the calves. The reason? He doesn’t want Libby to get too attached because after the Fair, the calves will be sold at an auction and turned into, well, hamburgers. It’s not something Libby has ever really thought about before – the fact that all the cows on her farm eventually become meat on somebody’s table, even her own. I mean, she has always known this, but never really thought about it that much until she spends months and months looking into the big brown eyes of her two little calves.

When Piggy has a barnyard accident he fails to do what beef cattle need to do – gain weight. Libby’s Dad tells her that he must be sold now, before the Fair, before he can lose anymore weight.

Libby’s Dad: Listen Lib, cattle are raised to produce food. Steers are not pets. They need to be sold at market weight. Otherwise, their meat will be no good, and all the feeding and caring you’ve done for them will be for nothing.

Libby: He was just making me face what would happen at the end of every steer project. They all end with goodbye.

Libby turns her attention to Mule, her last chance to have a champion steer…and faces the inevitability of having to say goodbye to him eventually too. But she doesn’t like it, so she does the one thing she can think of to do in protest, she announces to her family that she is now a vegetarian.

No meat. It’s just disrespecttful to our fine furry and feathered friends.

In a cattle raising family, this is quite a bombshell announcement. Libby finds that it is harder than she thought to stick to her new eating rules. She also discovers that it is harder than she thought to figure out how she really feels about meat and whether people should eat it.

This book is a really good look at life on an Indiana farm. It’s also a really good look at a person trying to figure out how they feel about eating meat. Whether you are a person that doesn’t mind eating meat or a person who doesn’t even want to think about it, much less do it, Libby, her family and her farming community will give you a lot to consider. Plus, Libby’s best friend and her little sister are terrific characters and add a lot of comic relief to the story.

One of the subplots (a subplot is a part of the story that isn’t the main action, but still part of what’s going on) is about Libby entering the Beef Princess contest at the Fair. A tomboy vegetarian is a pretty funny contestant for a pageant promoting beef. Author: Michelle Houts

  • Look Inside The Beef Princess of Practical County
  • Read Chapter One The Beef Princess of Practical County
The Beef Princess reminds me a lot of Charlotte’s Web. Fern and Libby have a lot in common. They both love their animals and even though they KNOW farm animals are raised to be eaten, they don’t want the animals they love to be made into dinner.  
Charlotte's Web Our Farm Vegetarian Food Cattle Kids
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Komodo Dragons NEW at the Indy Zoo

Komodo Dragons NEW at the Indy Zoo

The Komodo Dragon is the largest living species of lizard. These lizards can grow to be 6-10 feet long! The Komodo Dragon lives on islands in Indonesia. People in Indonesia call them “land crocodiles.”  Nothing on the islands preys on Komodo Dragons, so they can grow BIG and LONG. And if that isn’t impressive enough, they have teeth like sharks and poisonous spit! You can get an up close look at them all summer at the Indianapolis Zoo. (Keep your fingers out of the cage, though, OK?!)  The exhibit, called Dragons of Komodo, opens today, May 23, 2009 and will stay until September 7, 2009.

National Geographic/Denver Zoo Video:

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Indy 500

Indy 500

Indy Racing It’s almost race day. Try some of these websites to find out what’s going on during race weekend and to test your racing skills online.

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