Tag Archives: Indiana

Young Hoosiers 2015-2016

Young Hoosiers 2015-2016

Picture Book List

***WINNER The Day the Crayons Quit by Drew Daywalt with 9,364 votes.***

Ben Rides On Cowpoke Clyde Crankee Doodle The Day the Crayons Quit
Eat Like a Bear EIEIO How Old McDonald Got His Farm The Girl Who Heard Colors How to Train a Train
Memoirs of a Hamster Mitchell Goes Bowling Mos Mustache Mr Tiger Goes Wild
My Dream Playground On a Beam of Light Outfoxed Take Me Out to the Yakyu
The Three Little Pigs and the Somewhat Bad Wolf Unicorn Thinks He's Pretty Great Water in the Park What Floats in a Moat

Intermediate List

***WINNER Escape from Mr. Lemoncello’s Library by Chris Grabenstein with 1,048 votes.***

Africa Is My Home Almost Super The Blossoming Universe of Violet Diamond The Boy Who Loved Math
By the Grace of Todd Daredevil Doll Bones Dorko the Magnificent
Electrical Wizard Escape from Mr. Lemoncellos Library Frogged Gone Fishing
The Great American Dust Bowl How Do You Burp In Space Odettes Secrets The Pet War
Rutherford B Who Was He The Secret Tree The Show Must Go On Wild Born

Middle Grade List

***WINNER Unbreakable by Kami Garcia with 207 votes.***

Far Far Away The Fellowship for Alien Detection The Girl From Felony Bay The Great Trouble
The Heartbreak Messenger The Hidden Summer The Impossible Knife Infestation
Jinx The Living The Lost Kingdom Odettes Secrets
The Right Fight Sasquatch in the Paint The School for Good and Evil A Summer of Sundays
Sure Signs of Crazy The Time Fetch Twerp Unbreakable
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Staying Power: 50 Classic Kids’ Books from 1917 We Still Read Today

Staying Power: 50 Classic Kids’ Books from 1917 We Still Read Today

Classic /ˈklasik/ Judged over a period of time to be of the highest quality and outstanding of its kind. Ex. “a classic novel”

If you were alive in 1917 when Central Library was built, this is what one of the bookcases in the children’s section might have looked like.

Listed below are 50 books for kids published before 1917 that were on the shelves back then. These books are classics, having stood the test of time. They have been favorites for more than 100 years! Click on any book jacket to read the book right now! You don’t even need to wait to check it out. These books are part of the public domain. Public domain means that since these books were published before 1923, they are not subject to copyright. That means you can read them for free! You can find even MORE classic books for kids to read for free at Read.gov: Classic Books and at The International Children’s Digital Library.


The Adventures of Huckleberry FinnThe Adventures of Tom SawyerAesop's FablesAlice's Adventures in WonderlandAnne of Green GablesThe Arabian NightsBlack BeautyThe Blue Fairy BookThe Call of the WildA Christmas CarolCinderellaGrimm's Fairy TalesGulliver's TravelsHans BrinkerHans Christian Andersen StoriesHeidiJack and the BeanstackThe Journey to the Centre of the EarthThe Jungle BookKidnappedThe Legend of Sleepy HollowThe Little PrincessLittle WomenThe Merry Adventures of Robin HoodNights with Uncle RemusOliver TwistPeter and WendyPeter RabbitThe Pied Piper of HamlinPinocchioPollyanna width=The Princess and the GoblinRebecca of Sunnybrook FarmRip Van WinkleRobinson CrusoeThe Secret GardenSnow WhiteThe Story of the Champions of the Round TableThe Story of the Three PigsThe Swiss Family RobinsonThe Tales of Mother GooseThe Nutcracker and the Mouse KingThe Three MusketeersThrough the Looking GlassTreasure IslandTwenty Thousand Leagues Under the SeaA Visit from Saint NicholasWhite FangThe Wind in the WillowsThe Wonderful Wizard of Oz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Meet the Author: James Whitcomb Riley

Meet the Author: James Whitcomb Riley

The poet James Whitcomb Riley was born in Greenfield, Indiana on October 7, 1849. To give you an idea about how long ago that was, he was about 12 years old when the U.S. Civil War started.  Thomas Edison and Alexander Graham Bell were both born around the same time.

At the time of his death on July 22, 1916, James Whitcomb Riley was a beloved figure in Indiana. He was also well known for writing in dialect. A dialect is a particular form of a language that is special to a specific region, in this case Indiana. It is similar to what we would call an accent today. When a person read his poetry, it was like listening to a neighbor. People really liked that. Many of his poems were funny. People really liked that too. Riley traveled the country giving live shows reading his poetry. In his time, he was a rock star! His death was such news it made front page headlines in major newspapers all across the country. There is an old scrapbook of the events that followed his death at The James Whitcomb Riley Home & Museum. You can look at this scrapbook online. It has all kinds of old newspaper clippings in it. One of the headlines about his funeral says, “35,000 People Pass Casket of Indiana Poet”. That is a lot of people! 

During Riley’s life people did not have radios in their homes yet. To listen to music or readings they used phonographs. In Riley’s day you had to hand crank a machine to listen to a recording. Very early ones recorded onto cylinders. Later ones recorded onto flat discs, like a CD, only larger. Today you can play a digital file of an audiobook on your phone or computer. In 1912 Riley recorded poetry readings for the Victor Talking Machine Company on one of those flat discs so that people could listen at home – an old time audiobook. We have these old Riley Recordings at IndyPL in our digital collection. James Whitcomb Riley Recordings You can listen to the man himself reading his own poetry. Lucky for you they are in a digital file now!

Mr. Riley’s most famous poems for children were and still are, “Raggedy Man,” “The Little Orphant Annie,” “When the Frost is on the Punkin,” and “The Old Swimmin’ Hole.” You can read them right now in these free eBook from IUPUI. I recommend the deliciously scary “The Little Orphant Annie.” Annie is a great storyteller! She tells the story of why you better mind your parents because “The gobble-uns’ll git you ef you don’t watch out!” To read it click on the blue book Riley Child Rhymes and then click on page 23.

Read Right Now! Free eBooks:

Riley Child RhymesThe Book of Joyous ChildrenThe Raggedy Man

Websites:

In the spirit of another beloved Hoosier, David Letterman:

Top 10 Ways to Know James Whitcomb Riley was a Rock Star of his Time:

10. His book  Rhymes of Childhood was published in 1912. Today, over 100 years later, you can easily find his book at the library or go to an online bookstore and find it for sale as a print book or an eBook. There are not very many books that are still printed from that long ago!

9. In the late 1890s he encouraged the African American poet Paul Laurence Dunbar. He wrote Dunbar a letter of recommendation that helped get his work published.

8. When Riley died, the President of the United states, Woodrow Wilson, and the Vice-President of the United States, Thomas Riley Marshall (who was from Columbia City, Indiana), both sent messages of condolence to his family. The Governor of Indiana allowed him to be laid in state at The Indiana Statehouse Rotunda so that people could come pay their respects. Until that time, only Abraham Lincoln had been honored in that way.

7. Greenfield, IN, his birthplace, and Indianapolis, IN, his home for over 20 years, fought over where he should be buried. Over Riley’s Dead Body: Indy’s Weirdest Civic Fight. Indianapolis won. He was buried at Crown Hill Cemetery in a tomb at the top of a hill, the highest point in Indianapolis. Section 61, Lot 1.

6. Both his boyhood home in Greenfield, IN and his adult home in Indianapolis, IN are museums and on the National Register of Historic Places.

5. The James Whitcomb Riley Hospital for Children was created and named in his honor in 1924. In 1955 the hospital added Camp Riley, a camp for youth with disabilities.

4. In 1940, the U.S. Postal Service issued a 10-cent stamp honoring Riley.

3. A cargo ship, the SS James Whitcomb Riley, was commissioned in 1942 during World War II.

2. There used to be a Hoosier Poet Brand of coffee, oatmeal, vegetables, cigars and more.

1. James Whitcomb Riley donated the land indyPL’s Central Library is built on. The bronze gates at the main entrance on St. Clair Street were purchased with pennies donated by children. The bronze tables on each of the iron gates say: The gates are the gift of the children of Indianapolis in loving remembrance of their friend James Whitcomb Riley

Print Books:

When the Frost is on the PunkinThe Gobble-uns'll Git You Ef You Don't Watch OutLittle Orphant AnnieHoosier Boy James Whitcomb RileyJames Whitcomb Riley Young Poet
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Amazing Olympic Athlete Wilma Rudolph

Amazing Olympic Athlete Wilma Rudolph

Amazing Olympic Athlete Wilma Rudolph

Wilma Rudolph had polio when she was six years old. Polio is a virus that can cause paralysis. Now we have a vaccine for polio but that wasn’t invented yet when Wilma was little. The polio did not paralyze Wilma, but it did leave one leg crooked and Wilma had to wear a brace to help her walk.

When Wilma was nine she took the brace off and when she was eleven she started to play sports in school. Eventually, Wilma won gold medals at the Olympics as a runner. For the next two weeks you can watch the stories of Olympic athletes at the 2010 Vancourver Winter Olympic games. Lots of them will have inspirational stories too. It takes a lot of hard work and determination to compete at the Olympic Level.

Take a look at this great video of Wilma talking about her own life and her experiences at the Olympics.

Websites:

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The Dungeoneers

The Dungeoneers

The Dungeoneers

Colm Candorly has eight sisters. Eight’s a bunch of anything, but that’s a whole lot of sisters! They call him cutesy names and steal his underwear and giggle all the time. Colm copes by hiding when he can using superior stealth skills and by teasing them mercilessly, like stealing their brushes and hair pins.

Colm’s dad has it worse – he has to feed and clothe them all. But Colm’s parents make do and are happy doing it, until Colm’s sister Seysha gets sick and their  meager stack of coins isn’t enough to pay for food as well as a doctor. Colm might get annoyed at his sisters, but he can’t stand the thought of any of them suffering. He turns his stealthy brother skills to shady but necessary use heading to the Village Square and “acquiring” a rich man’s purse with his nimble fingers. Colm justifies his actions like Robin Hood would – stealing from the rich to give to the poor. When Colm’s father sees the money he doesn’t see it that way at all and is determined to have Colm confess to the Village Magistrate and return the money. Colm’s father wants him to confess, hoping to save Colm from a more severe punishment – like the removal of his thieving hand!

At just the right moment, in steps Finn Argos, a mystery man who observed Colm’s pickpocket skills in the Village Square and has an idea for how best to use them. Mr. Argos is a teacher; a mentor, looking for an apprentice. He thinks Colm is perfect for the job. Stealthy. Quick. Nimble Fingers. What does Mr. Argos teach? “The Aquisition of Resources.”  In other words, “Thievery.” Finn Argos recruits talent for a guild lead by one Tye Thwoden. The  guild practices dungeoneering, a kind of treasure hunting that pits teams of raiders against the trolls, goblins, and other assorted monsters that guard treasure hidden in dungeons – treasure protected further by sinister booby traps, diabolical wizardry and complex locks. Finn agrees to pay off Colm’s debts in exchange for Colm’s talents – Finn wants Colm to come live at the guild and learn to be part of a dungeoneer team, because all good teams need a crack lockpick wiht nimble pickpocket fingers.

Colm takes Finn up on his offer. Arriving at the guild, Colm is put on a team specifically chosen to work together. Colm’s role is to be the Rogue, picking locks & outsmarting traps. His teammates are:

  • Lena, a warrior girl (who can’t stand the sight of her own blood)
  • Quinn, a stuttering wizard (who has major confidence issues)
  • Serene, a druid who can talk to animals (who is too afraid to talk to animals with teeth)

The four of them, with their talents and fears, become a team in Thwoden’s Legion.

Friends. Adventure. Challenges. Treasure. Glory.

It is as exactly as fun as it sounds.

“Now I’m not sure how a stuttering mage, a swooning barbarian, a timid druid, and a fledgling rogue will play out in the bards’ songs, but I’ve shaped the most brittle iron into a blade so strong it can cut through a behemoth’s hide. So as long as you are members of this guild, we will turn you into dungeoneers, or my name’s not Tye Thwodin.” (page 145)

Websites:

More Books by John David Anderson:

Standard Hero Behavior Sidekicked Minion

 

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