Tag Archives: Indiana

Indiana

Indiana

INDIANA FACTS

Indiana It's My State

If you have Indiana homework this page will help you get started tracking down facts and finding information about Hoosiers, even the ones that aren’t that famous. The page is divided into five sections:

  • Facts
  • Images & Project Ideas
  • People
  • Landmarks
  • Stories Set In Indiana

Each section includes a list of books and websites. Pay special attention to the “Images and Project Ideas” Section – listed here are places to find Indiana photos online, pictures of Indiana artifacts and even instructions for drawing Indiana pictures.

Books:

Websites:


IMAGES & PROJECT IDEAS

Books

How to Draw Indianas Sites and Symbols Great Lakes States Crafts

Websites:


PEOPLE

Books:

Bill Peet Madam CJ Walker Major Taylor Ernie Pyle

INAuthorDatabaseLogo

Indiana University: Indiana Authors Database – A searchable database of the book, Indiana Authors and Their Books, published by Wabash College in 1949, 1974, and 1981. The encyclopedia covers nearly two hundred years of Indiana’s literary history (1816–1980).

Websites:

 

LANDMARKS

Books:

Websites:


STORIES SET IN INDIANA

The Bears of Blue River The Beef Princess of Practical County Bernie Macgruder and the Bats in the Belfrey Blossoms on the Roof
Chasing Orion Chrsitmas After All The Dark Didnt Catch Me A Girl of the Limberlost
A Halloween Scare in Indiana Help Im Prisoner in the Library Here Lies the Librarian Honey
Izzys Place The Mighty Miss Malone My Brother Abe A Place Called Freedom
Running Out of Time The School at Crooked Creek
Print This Post Print This Post

Black History: Musicians & Singers

Black History: Musicians & Singers

Sweethearts of Rhythm

Featured Musicians: The Sweethearts of Rhythm The Sweethearts of Rhythm were a real all girl band that traveled around the country in the 1930s and 1940s. The band was unusual because it was all girls and because it was integrated.

One reason the girls got this chance is World War II. A lot of men were fighting in the war so it was easier for a girl band to get gigs. Once they did, they became popular because they were so good.

Sometimes the band had trouble because it was integrated. When the band played in the South they had to sleep on their tour bus because it was illegal there for black and white people to be in the same restaurant or hotel. Sometimes the girls had to wear disguises to hide the fact that their skin color was not all the same.

The author tells the story of the Sweethearts in poems and she uses the rhythms of jazz music in her poetry. It’s not like reading a book of facts. Read the poems, look at the great pictures and then don’t forget to read the author’s note in the back.


Websites:


Books:

Here are some more books that highlight African American music, composers, singers & musicians from slave work songs to spirituals to songs of the civil rights movement::
ABZ JazzMusicians Rock Band
Nothing Last Sweet Hollow
Voice Nobody Saturday Flo
Blackbird Josephine Dream Billie
Marion Louis Duke Bessie
like-a-bird jazz-day-the-making-of-a-famous-photograph

 

African American Music in Indiana

From the 1870s to the 1950s, Indiana Avenue in Indianapolis served as the focal point of Indianapolis’s black community. Originally called Indiana Street, the Avenue begins at the intersection of Illinois and Ohio Streets and extends northwest. While the Avenue was originally settled by German and Irish immigrants, by 1870 one-third of Indianapolis’s black population lived near Indiana Avenue. The black population in Indianapolis surged in the early 1900s as blacks migrated to the city from the South.

FocusOnIndianaSmallThe Indiana Avenue businesses included restaurants, saloons, grocery stores, clothing stores, hair stylists, barber shops, a hotel, and more. Some of the most famous businesses on the Avenue were the Indianapolis Recorder (a black newspaper) and the Walker Building (which housed a casino and theatre, offices, a beauty college, drugstore, and restaurant.) In the 1930s, the Avenue’s businesses were focused on food and entertainment. By 1940 there were more than twenty-five jazz clubs on the Avenue where both national talent and local legends played. I wonder if the Sweethearts of Rhythm ever played there?

(from The Indiana Historical Society 2011 Indiana Black History Challenge)


More Info Guides about Black History:

 

Print This Post Print This Post

Black History: The Civil Rights Movement

Black History: The Civil Rights Movement

Claudette ColvinFeatured Civil Rights Activist: Claudette Colvin grew up in Alabama in the 1940s and 1950s. At that time, Jim Crow rules dominated her life. Jim Crow rules were designed to keep black people and white people separated. These are the rules that said black people could not eat in certain restaurants or sit in certain seats on a city bus. When Claudette was 15 years old she refused to give up her seat on a bus to a white person, so she was arrested. You’re probably thinking, no, that was Rosa Parks. It’s true, Rosa Parks did the same thing, but Claudette did it too! A lawsuit was filed on behalf of several people, including Claudette and Rosa, to end bus segregation, and eventually, they won. Rosa is more well known, but Claudette was right there too, and she was just a kid! Reading her story helps you understand that it took lots of people, young and old, to change the Jim Crow rules. A lot of people were brave enough to stand up and say, “no more!”

This book includes interviews with Claudette herself, so you get the story straight from her. She talks about what it felt like to live with Jim Crow; to constantly be told, “you can’t”. When you hear a real person talking about it, it seems much more real than reading a plain description. Claudette was there and she can speak for herself. If you like reading about Claudette, try Marching For Freedom. That one tells the story of kids who marched in Selma, Alabama to help win black people the right to vote. It’s really good too and includes interviews with people who were kids back then and were actually there.


Indiana History and Civil Rights:

FocusOnIndianaSmall

If you like Claudette’s story you might like finding out about a strong Hoosier woman who fought for her rights. When Indiana became a state in 1816, the constitution stated, “there shall be neither slavery nor involuntary servitude.” In early 1816, Mary Bateman Clark, a slave in Kentucky, was sold and brought to Knox County, Indiana, as an “indentured servant.” In 1821 Clark filed suit for her freedom. The Knox County Circuit Court ruled against Clark’s petition to end her indentured servitude. Clark appealed to the Indiana Supreme Court, which ruled that Clark’s status was clearly not voluntary. The court awarded Clark her freedom and in doing so set a precedent for freedom for other indentured blacks held in Indiana.

mary-clark-marker


Websites:


Books:


More ore about these Civil Rights Movement Events and People:


More Info Guides about Black History:

Print This Post Print This Post

Black History: Athletes

Black History: Athletes
Marshall Featured Athlete Marshall “Major” Taylor: This is the story of a young African-American boy who grew up in Indianapolis over a hundred years ago. Despite living at a time when African-Americans were often denied basic rights, Marshall Taylor became a world champion cyclist. Marshall earned the nickname “Major” when he performed bicycle tricks as a very young boy dressed in a military style costume. When he was a teenager he stopped performing tricks and moved on to bicycle racing – and he was really, really good – world champion good! His story is inspiring because he persevered even when there were many people who didn’t want him to even be in a race, let alone win, just because he was African-American. Sometimes he rode fast just to get away from angry people chasing him! Author: Marlene Targ Brill
In Indianapolis, we have the Major Taylor Velodrome, a world-class bicycle racing track named for this cycling great. You can ride your bike and also use inline skates at the Velodrome. If you want to try riding there, it’s best if you are at least 10 years old. Call ahead and see if you can arrange a time to go try it out. And don’t forget your helmet! 3649 Cold Spring Rd., Indianapolis, IN 46222 Velodrome Phone: 317-327-8356.

Websites – Marshall Taylor:


Featured Athlete Oscar RobertsonHave you ever heard of Indiana’s own Olympian Oscar Robertson? In 1955 Oscar went to Crispus Attucks High School. Oscar’s team won the Indiana State Championship, becoming the first all-black school in the nation to win a state title. Robertson led Crispus Attucks to another championship in 1956. Oscar was so good he played in College and went on to win a gold medal with the US Basketball team at the 1960 Olympic Games. During his NBA career with the Cincinnati Royals and the Milwaukee Bucks, Robertson became one of the top-scoring guards of all time, scoring 26,710 points.

Websites – Oscar Robertson:


Websites – African-American Athletes:

Books – African-American Athletes:

Sports Athletes2 Ship Fair
Touch Jesse Hope Jump
Trouble Satchel Champ Queen
Henry Jackie Lebron gabby-douglas
serena-williams

 

More Info Guides about Black History:

Print This Post Print This Post

Amazing Olympic Athlete Wilma Rudolph

Amazing Olympic Athlete Wilma Rudolph

Amazing Olympic Athlete Wilma Rudolph

Wilma Rudolph had polio when she was six years old. Polio is a virus that can cause paralysis. Now we have a vaccine for polio but that wasn’t invented yet when Wilma was little. The polio did not paralyze Wilma, but it did leave one leg crooked and Wilma had to wear a brace to help her walk.

When Wilma was nine she took the brace off and when she was eleven she started to play sports in school. Eventually, Wilma won gold medals at the Olympics as a runner. For the next two weeks you can watch the stories of Olympic athletes at the 2010 Vancourver Winter Olympic games. Lots of them will have inspirational stories too. It takes a lot of hard work and determination to compete at the Olympic Level.

Take a look at this great video of Wilma talking about her own life and her experiences at the Olympics.

Websites:

Print This Post Print This Post
1 2 3 4