Tag Archives: #WeNeedDiverseBooks

Black History: Athletes

Black History: Athletes

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Marshall “Major” Taylor World Champion Cyclist 1899-1901 is the story of a young boy who grew up in Indianapolis over a hundred years ago. Despite living at a time when African-Americans were often denied basic rights, Marshall Taylor became a world champion cyclist. Marshall earned the nickname “Major” when he performed bicycle tricks dressed in a military style costume. When he was a teenager he stopped performing tricks and moved on to bicycle racing – and he was really, really good – world champion good! His story is inspiring because he persevered even when there were many people who didn’t want him to even be in a race, let alone win, just because he was African-American. Sometimes he rode fast just to get away from angry people chasing him!

In Indianapolis, we have the Major Taylor Velodrome, a world-class bicycle racing track named for this cycling great. You can ride your bike and also use inline skates at the Velodrome. If you want to try riding there, it’s best if you are at least 10 years old. Call ahead and see if you can arrange a time to go try it out. And don’t forget your helmet! 3649 Cold Spring Rd., Indianapolis, IN 46222 Velodrome Phone: 317-327-8356.

Listed below are books, websites & databases that will help you learn about more black athletes and the contributions they have made in their sport and in their communities. 

The Muhammad Ali Boxing Game is an Artifact at The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis. It showcases the popularity of Ali. How many athletes have a game named after them? During the 1960’s boxer Cassius Clay, who later changed his name to Muhammad Ali, was a positive role model for many African-Americans. Ali was more than a boxer. He expressed his political views on the Civil Rights Movement and the Vietnam War. In 1967, Ali was stripped of his world title due to his refusal to be drafted. After retiring, Ali collaborated with the United Nations to promote peace around the world.

To learn even more about fascinating and inspiring black athletes, visit the Center for Black Literature & Culture at Central Library. The Center is dedicated to celebrating the vibrant and resilient heritage and triumphs of those born of African roots.


Websites:

Biography in Context is a database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home with your IndyPL Library Card. Login using your library card number and PIN. What’s My PIN? Biography in Context will show you biographies, magazines, videos and more about Marshall Taylor and other African American Athletes.​


eBooks:

IndyPLLibraryCard100
Use your indyPL Library Card number and PIN to check out FREE Online eBooks. Click on a book jacket & enter your Library Card number and PIN to borrow. What’s My PIN?Overdrive

Emmanuel's DreamI Am Jackie RobinsonLeBron JamesReggie Miller from DowntownSomething to Prove the Great Satchel PaigeStephen Curry

Print Books:

A Nation's Hope the Legendary Joe LouisBlack History Makers AthletesDaring PlayFair Ball!Gabby DouglasGreat African Americans in SportsHenry Aaron's DreamJesse OwensJumpLeBron JamesNothing But Trouble the Stor of Althea GibsonOn the Court with Stephen CurryQueen of the Track Alice CoachmanRemember My Name Mo'ne DavisThe Champ the Story of Muhammad AliTouch the SkyWe Are the ShipWilma Unlimited

Moreabout Black History:

 

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Author Spotlight: Ashley Bryan

Author Spotlight: Ashley Bryan

Have you ever wondered what it’s like to be an award-winning artist? Words to My Life’s Song is an autobiography that gives a glimpse into the imaginings and memories of three-time Coretta Scott King Award winning illustrator, Ashley Bryan. Mr Bryan frames the book as an afternoon spent walking around his home on an island in Maine. As we wander, Mr. Bryan tells us about his life growing up in the Bronx, going to art school, being in the army, teaching art, and discovering his passion for illustrating books. Along the way, we see a lot of his colorful paintings, stained glass and cut paper creations. This book is a bright, joyful celebration of life and creativity.

Recommended by: Hannah Wheeler – Lawrence

Mr. Bryan book, “Freedom Over Me: Eleven Slaves, Their Lives & Dreams Brought to Life” was named a 2017 Newbery Medal Honor Book as well as being named a 2017 Coretta Scott King Award Honor Book for both his writing and illustrations.

 


Books written and/or illustrated by Ashely Bryan:

ashley-bryans-puppetssail-awayLetShineAfricanTalesPoetryThunder>AshleyStableScare

Websites:

More about Black History:

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Read Right Now! Martin Luther King Jr.

Read Right Now! Martin Luther King Jr.
Picture Book of Martin Luther King Jr. ReadingRainbow
Watch Right Now! A Picture Book of Martin Luther King Jr. Read by LeVar Burton, Reading Rainbow Story Time – A biography of the Baptist minister and civil rights leader whose philosophy and practice of nonviolent civil disobedience helped American blacks win many battles for equal rights.

Martin Luther King Comic Book FOR Logo
Read Right Now! 1956 Martin Luther King “Montgomery Story” Comic Book published by The Fellowship of the Reconciliation.

Explore the books & links below to find out more about Martin Luther King Jr. and why the March on Washington was so important.

The words in I Have a Dream are the words from Martin Luther King Jr.’s famous “I Have a Dream” speech which he delivered on August 28, 1963 during the March on Washington. Marchers came from all over to gather in front of the Lincoln Memorial. A lot more people watched the march and heard this speech on television.

The paintings in the book were done by Kadir Nelson. The book was named a 2013 Coretta Scott King Illustrator Award Honor Book.

 

 

Websites:

Books about The March on Washington & “I Have a Dream”

WeMarch MarchOn IHave MartinMahalia
MartinMarch Dream

Books about Martin Luther King Jr.

History MLK DreamMLK MLK2
Daddy MLK3 UncleMartin BigHeart
ReadDream Riding Love Will See You Through True Martin Luther King Jr

 

More Info Guides about Black History:

Book Recommendations by: Janet Spaulding, Selection Services

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Read Thru History: Civil Rights Timeline 1954-1968

Read Thru History: Civil Rights Timeline 1954-1968

More Homework Help
Read Through History: Civil Rights Timeline to 1954
Read Through History: Civil Right Timeline Since 1968

To the Mountaintop was written by Charlayne Hunter-Gault. Charlayne was one of the first black students admitted to the University of Georgia in 1961. In this book, Charlayne tells her own story as well as the stories of other people, children and young adults like her, who played very important roles in the Civil Rights Movement. It is an interesting book because she was so young. We can listen to her own story in her own words. Eyewitness accounts help us experience an event firsthand. We can take a moment to walk in someone else’s shoes. By reading the accounts of people who who were alive at the time, we can empathize with their suffering and understand why the Civil Rights Movement was so important to ensure their safety and freedom.

In To the Mountaintop, one of the people Charlayne talks about is Ruby Bridges, the first black child to desegregate an all-white elementary school in New Orleans, Louisiana. Ruby was in elementary school, Charlayne was in college, both were brave enough to do something first. Ruby in particular became an icon of the Civil Rights Movement. An icon is a person or Problem We All Live With painting by Norman Rockwellthing that represents something bigger. Ruby was a little girl, but became a symbol of the struggle for Civil Rights for all black people in our country. One of the things that helped make Ruby an icon is this painting by American painter Norman Rockwell. The painting shows Ruby being escorted to school by four US Marshals. Four. It took four law enforcement officers to protect her. That is really hard to understand; that a child would need escorted to school like that. The painting is called “The Problem We All Live With“. In 2011 President Barack Obama arranged to borrow the painting from the Norman Rockwell museum. He had it hung outside the Oval Office and invited Ruby to come see it. Watch this video carefully to hear President Obama say something important:

“I think it’s fair to say that if it hadn’t been for you guys, I might not be here and we wouldn’t be looking at this together.”

He said something very similar during his campaign for President in 2007.

“I’m here because somebody marched. I’m here because you all sacrificed for me. I stand on the shoulders of giants.” ~Speech, Selma Voting Rights March Commemoration in Selma, Alabama, March 4, 2007

Listed below is a timeline of important events of the Civil Rights Movement. These events culminated with the passing of the Civil Rights Act in 1964 and the Voting Rights Act in 1965. For each event a few books are listed, both fiction and non-fiction, that bring the events and people to life. Take a book walk through history to learn about these fascinating, determined, brave people who stood together so no one stood alone.


1954: Brown Vs. Board of Education was a landmark United States Supreme Court case. The Court declared state laws allowing separate public schools for black and white students to be unconstitutional. It was a major victory and important turning point for the Civil Rights Movement. The decision by the Court was unanimous (9–0). Unanimous means all of the supreme court justices agreed.


Brown v. Board of Education a Fight for Simple JusticeRemember the Journey to School Integration

1955: The Lynching of Emmett Till

Emmett Till was a 14-year-old African-American boy who was murdered in Mississippi in 1955 after allegedly offending a white woman in a grocery store. His killers were acquitted. The trial and acquittal drew attention to the long history of violent persecution of African-Americans in the United States. Emmett’s death became a rallying cry that helped people all over the country realize the critical importance of the Civil Rights Movement.


Midnight Without a Moon

1955-1956: Montgomery Bus Boycott

The Montgomery bus boycott was a protest against racially segregated seats on the public buses in Montgomery, Alabama. It sounds very strange today, but back then it was actually illegal for a black person and a white person to sit next to each other on a bus. The bus riding rules up to this point stated that African Americans could not be hired as bus drivers, had to ride in seats at the back of the bus, and had to give up their seat to a white person.The boycott began when Rosa Parks, an African-American woman, was arrested for refusing to give up her seat to a white person.


Rosa Parks: My StoryRosaThe Story of Rosa Parks and the Montgomery Bus Boycott in PhotographsClaudette Colvin Twice Toward Justice12 Incredible Facts about the Montgomery Bus BoycottBack of the Bus

1957: Little Rock Central High School Integration

The Little Rock Nine was a group of African American students who were enrolled in Little Rock Central High School in 1957. Even though the U.S. Supreme Court had already unanimously said in Brown v. Board of Education that all laws establishing segregated schools were unconstitutional, the students were initially prevented from entering the school. President Eisenhower then sent the 101st Airborne and the Arkansas National Guard to escort the students to school.


The Lions of Little RockThe Little Rock nine: a primary source exploration of the battle for school integrationThe story of the Little Rock Nine and school desegregation in photographsLittle Rock girl 1957 : how a photograph changed the fight for integration

1960: Greensboro, North Carolina Sit Ins 

The Greensboro sit-ins were a series of nonviolent protests against the segregated seating at lunch counters in restaurants. In Greensboro, North Carolina, four men sat down at the all-white lunch counter but no one would take their order. The sat quietly until the counter closed. The next day, joined by more people, they did the same thing. More people joined each day at more restaurants and in more cities. Sales at the boycotted stores went way down and gradually, the stores abandoned their segregation rules. Similar protests help change segregation policies at libraries, beaches, parks, swimming pools and museums. When the Civil Rights Act of 1964 finally passed, it ordered desegregation of all public places.


Sit-in : how four friends stood up by sitting downFreedom on the MenuMake a ChangeThese HandsSeeds of Freedom

1960: Ruby Bridges New Orleans, Louisiana

Ruby Bridges was the first black child to desegregate an all-white elementary school in Louisiana in 1960. Bridges and her mother were escorted to school by four federal marshals for the entire school year.


The Story of Ruby BridgesThrough My Eyes

1961: Freedom Riders

Freedom Riders were people who rode on buses to protest segregated seating. The United States Supreme Court had already ruled that segregated public buses were unconstitutional, but the law was not enforced. In protest, mixed racial groups rode the buses together to challenge the rules. The riders drew attention to the states that were not following federal law.


Night on FirePreaching to the ChickensThe story of the civil rights freedom rides in photographsShe Stood for Freedom

1963: Birmingham Children’s March

Birmingham Children’s March was a march by hundreds of school children in Birmingham, Alabama, May 2–5, 1963. The children left school and walked downtown to talk to the mayor about segregation. Many children were arrested. Fire hoses and police dogs were used to stop the march. This event compelled President Kennedy to publicly support federal civil rights legislation and led to the passage of the Civil Rights Act in 1964.


The Youngest MarcherWe've Got a JobBirmingham 1963When the Children Marched

1963: March on Washington

The March on Washington took place in Washington D.C. on Wednesday, August 28, 1963. The purpose of the march was to stand up for civil rights for African Americans. At the march, Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his historic “I Have a Dream” speech. The march helped pass the Civil Rights Act of 1964.


Voices from the March on WashingtonAs Good As AnybodyWe MarchI Have a DreamMarch On! The Day My Brother Martin Changed the WorldMartin's Dream DayThe March on Washington Primary Source ExplorationThe Story of the Civil Rights March on Washington in PhotographsMarching for Freedom

1963: 16th Street Baptist Church Bombing

The 16th Street Baptist Church Bombing occurred at the African-American 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama on Sunday, September 15, 1963. Four members of the Ku Klux Klan planted a bomb beneath the steps at the church, killing four little girls and injuring 22 others.


A Thousand Never EversThe Watsons Go to BirminghamBirmingham Sunday

1964: Civil Rights Act

The Civil Rights Act of 1964 ended segregation in public places and banned employment discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex or national origin.


Glory BeA Time to ActThe Civil Rights Act of 1964 a Primary Source Exploration>Freedom SummerFreedom Summer

1965: Voting Marches & the Voting Rights Act of 1965

The Selma to Montgomery Voting Marches were three protest marches along the 54-mile highway from Selma, Alabama to the state capital, Montgomery, Alabama. The marches were organized to support African-American citizens who anted to exercise their constitutional right to vote. The marches contributed to the passing of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, federal legislation that prohibits racial discrimination in voting.


The Story of the Selma Voting Rights Marches in PhotographsBlood BrotherTurning 15 on the Road to FreedomRevolutionLillian's Right to VoteGranddaddy's TurnBecause They Marched

To learn even more about fascinating and inspiring black black history makers, visit the Center for Black Literature & Culture at Central Library. The Center is dedicated to celebrating the vibrant and resilient heritage and triumphs of those born of African roots.

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Read Thru History: Civil Rights Timeline Since 1968

Read Thru History: Civil Rights Timeline Since 1968

1968 April 4 Martin Luther King Assasinated

The Rock and the River In 1968 Chicago, fourteen-year-old Sam Childs is caught in a conflict between his father’s nonviolent approach to seeking civil rights for African Americans and his older brother, who has joined the Black Panther Party. 1185803

One crazy summer / by Rita Williams-Garcia.In the summer of 1968, after traveling from Brooklyn to Oakland, California, to spend a month with the mother they barely know, eleven-year-old Delphine and her two younger sisters arrive to a cold welcome as they discover that their mother, a dedicated poet and printer, is resentful of the intrusion of their visit and wants them to attend a nearby Black Panther summer camp. Coretta Scott King Author Award, 2011 Young Hoosier Book Award, 2012-2013, 4-6 Nominee. A Junior Library Guild selection 1233655


1968 Memphis Sanitation Workers Strike

1972 Shirley Chisolm for President

Unbound and Unbossed

1973 Hip Hop

When the Beat was Born: DJ Cool Herc and the Creation of Hip Hop

1978 Affirmative Action 

refer to policies and initiatives aimed at compensating for past discrimination on the basis of race, color, sex, religion or national origin.

Slat in His Shoes (Michael Jordan)

1916-1970 Great Migration

Great Migration the Journey North Describes the period of the 20th century when many African Americans left the South to make better lives for themselves in the northern states. 1279293

The is the Rope a Story of the Great Migration

1995 Million Man March

The Hate You Give

Monster

How It Went Down


To learn even more about fascinating and inspiring black history makers, visit the Center for Black Literature & Culture at Central Library. The Center is dedicated to celebrating the vibrant and resilient heritage and triumphs of those born of African roots.

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