1 7 8 9 10 11 188

Stories About Loss, Death & Grieving

Stories About Loss, Death & Grieving
After Eli After Eli – After the death of his older brother, Daniel Anderson became engrossed in recording details about dead people, how they died, and whether their deaths mattered but he is eventually drawn back into interaction with the living. Young Hoosier Book Award, 2014-2015, 6-8 Nominee. Print, eBook
Another Kind of Hurricane Another Kind of Hurricane – The world, itself, seems to bring together Henry, whose best friend died near their home in the mountains of Vermont, and Zavion, who lost his home in Hurricane Katrina, so that the boys can help each other heal. Print
Bridge to Terabithia Bridge to Terabithia – The life of a ten-year-old boy in rural Virginia expands when he becomes friends with a newcomer who subsequently meets an untimely death trying to reach their hideaway, Terabithia, during a storm. Newbery Medal winner, 1978 Print, eBook, eAudio
Charlotte's Web Charlotte’s Web – Some Pig. Humble. Radiant. These are the words in Charlotte’s Web, high up in Zuckerman’s barn. Charlotte’s spiderweb tells of her feelings for a little pig named Wilbur, who simply wants a friend. It is the story of a girl named Fern, who saved Wilbur’s life when he was born the runt of his litter. A tender novel of friendship, love, life, and death. Print, eBook, eAudio
Confetti Girl Confetti Girl – After the death of her mother, Texas sixth-grader Lina’s grades and mood drop as she watches her father lose himself more and more in books, while her best friend uses Lina as an excuse to secretly meet her boyfriend. Print
Flip Flop Girl Flip Flop Girl – Uprooted following the death of their father, nine-year-old Vinnie and her five-year-old brother, Mason, cope in different ways–one in silence–but both with the help of Lupe, the flip-flop girl. Print
The Girl Who Threw Butterflies The Girl Who Threw Butterflies – Eighth-grader Molly’s ability to throw a knuckleball earns her a spot on the baseball team, which not only helps her feel connected to her recently deceased father, who loved baseball, it helps in other aspects of her life, as well. Young Hoosier Book Award, 2011-2012, 6-8 Nominee. PrinteBook
The Last Invisible Boy The Last Invisible Boy – In the wake of his father’s sudden death, twelve-year-old Finn feels he is becoming invisible as his hair and skin become whiter by the day, and so he writes and illustrates a book to try to understand what is happening and to hold on to himself and his father. Print
Milo Milo, Sticky Notes and Brain Freeze – In love with the girl he sneezed on the first day of school and best pals with Marshall, the “One Eyed Jack” of friends, seventh-grader Milo Cruikshank misses his mother whose death has changed everything at home. Print
Missing May Missing May – Missing her recently deceased second mother, May, Summer finds comfort and guidance with Cletus Underwood, a classmate who believes that he has come back from the dead, and together they conduct a seance to contact May. Newbery Medal winner, 1993 Print, eBook, eAudio
Mockingbird Mockingbird – Ten-year-old Caitlin, who has Asperger’s Syndrome, struggles to understand emotions, show empathy, and make friends at school, while at home she seeks closure by working on a project with her father. Young Hoosier Book Award, 2013-2014, 4-6 Nominee, A Junior Library Guild selection Print, eBook
The Thing About Jellyfish The Thing About Jellyfish – Twelve-year-old Suzy Swanson wades through her intense grief over the loss of her best friend by investigating the rare jellyfish she is convinced was responsible for her friend’s death. Print, eBook
Umbrella Summer Umbrella Summer – After her brother Jared dies, ten-year-old Annie worries about the hidden dangers of everything, from bug bites to bicycle riding, until she is befriended by a new neighbor who is grieving her own loss. Print, eBook
Waiting for Unicorns Waiting for Unicorns – After her mother dies, twelve-year-old Talia McQuinn goes to the Arctic with her father, a whale researcher. Over the course of one summer, and through several unlikely friendships, Talia learns that stories have the power to connect us, to provide hope, and to pull us out of the darkness. Print
Print This Post Print This Post

Staff Pick: Awful Ogre Running Wild

Staff Pick: Awful Ogre Running Wild

Awful Ogre Running Wild

For Awful Ogre, the coming of summer offers opportunities to get outside and swim, visit a favorite hotel, and climb an isolated mountain. Throughout this set of whimsical poems, youngsters will be entertained not only by Awful Ogre’s actions but also by the rhythm of the poetry.

“Awful Ogre Running Wild is a book of poetry about Awful Ogre and his adventures. However, this ogre isn’t scary; he’s silly. Each poem has full page, full color drawings of Awful Ogre doing something funny like swimming with his pet piranha or having a snack of dried weasel remains with his Grandma Ogress. It’s short, lively, and funny poetry about a slightly silly monster.”

Recommended by: Keith Dinnage – Haughville Library

Print This Post Print This Post

Snow Forts, Snowballs & Snowflakes

Snow Forts, Snowballs & Snowflakes

Snow Forts

Provides tips and techniques for building snow forts, slides, and games


Snowball Launchers

Offers instructions for fifteen unusual projects including a rocket-propelled toy car, an automatic dog feeder, storm-predicting bells, and a mechanical snowball thrower.

 

 


Snowflake Bentley

Wilson Bentley, a real guy also known as “The Snowflake Man”, was fascinated with snow even as a young man. He started photographing individual snowflakes…and since no two are alike, you know that’s a lot of flakes! He collected snowflake crystals and worked on perfecting the technique to photograph them his entire life. Click on the link below to see some of his pictures. I really didn’t know that the snowflakes you cut out of paper…really do look like the real crystals. The flakes are really beautiful. Author: Jacqueline Martin Illustrator: Mary Azarian

 

Print This Post Print This Post

Read Right Now! Martin Luther King Jr.

Read Right Now! Martin Luther King Jr.
Picture Book of Martin Luther King Jr. ReadingRainbow
Watch A Picture Book of Martin Luther King Jr. Read by LeVar Burton – Reading Rainbow Story Time. A biography of the Baptist minister and civil rights leader whose philosophy and practice of nonviolent civil disobedience helped American blacks win many battles for equal rights.

Martin Luther King Comic Book FOR Logo
Read 1956 Martin Luther King “Montgomery Story” Comic Book published by The Fellowship of the Reconciliation.

The words in this book are the words from Martin Luther King Jr.’s famous “I have a dream” speech which he delivered on August 28, 1963 during the March on Washington. Marchers came from all over to gather in front of the Lincoln Memorial. A lot more people watched the march and heard this speech on television.

The paintings in the book were done by Kadir Nelson. The book was named a 2013 Coretta Scott King Illustrator Award Honor Book.

Explore the books & links below to watch the speech itself or find out more about why the March on Washington was so important.


Websites:


Books about The March on Washington & “I Have a Dream”

WeMarch MarchOn IHave MartinMahalia
MartinMarch Dream

Books about Martin Luther King Jr.

History MLK DreamMLK MLK2
Daddy MLK3 UncleMartin BigHeart
ReadDream Riding Love Will See You Through True Martin Luther King Jr

 

More Info Guides about Black History:

Book Recommendations by: Janet Spaulding, Selection Services

Print This Post Print This Post

Staff Pick: From the Mixed Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler

Staff Pick: From the Mixed Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler

From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basel E. Frankweiler

Having run away with her younger brother to live in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, twelve-year-old Claudia strives to keep things in order in their new home and to become a changed person and a heroine to herself. Newbery Medal winner, 1968.

“Growing up, I loved FROM THE MIXED-UP FILES OF MRS BASIL E FRANKWEILER. I could relate to twelve year old Claudia, who feels like nothing is her very own, so, she decides to do something about it. With her younger brother Jamie, Claudia runs away to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. There, they establish a routine: hiding from the museum guards by standing on the restroom toilets, bathing in the fountain, and sleeping in famous people’s beds. Claudia discovers a mystery that she gets to solve, finally finding something that is hers alone. This book is a Newbery Award winner for its exceptional writing.”

Recommended by: Karen Perry – Franklin Road Library

Print This Post Print This Post
1 7 8 9 10 11 188