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Author Spotlight: Pam Muñoz Ryan

Author Spotlight: Pam Muñoz Ryan


Books by Pam Muñoz Ryan:

Becoming Naomi LeonEchoEsperanza RisingPaint the WindThe Dreamer

Websites:


More about Women’s History:

 

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Author Spotlight: Ann M. Martin

Author Spotlight: Ann M. Martin

 


Books by Ann M. Martin:

A Corner of the UniverseA Dog's LifeBetter to WishRain ReignTen Rules for Living With My Sister

Websites:


More about Women’s History:

 

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Author Spotlight: Raina Telgemeier

Author Spotlight: Raina Telgemeier


Books by Raina Telgemeier:

DramaKristy's Great IdeaSistersSmile

Websites:


More about Women’s History:

 

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Science Experiment: Newton’s Second Law of Motion

Science Experiment: Newton’s Second Law of Motion

Find More Science Experiments

Today’s experiment will demonstrate Newton’s Second Law of Motion.

Newton’s Second Law of Motion: Acceleration is produced when a force acts on a mass. The greater the mass (of the object being accelerated) the greater the amount of force needed (to accelerate the object).

SIMPLY: Pushing or pulling an object produces acceleration, a change in the speed of motion. Believe it or not, an accelertion can be a slowdown OR a speedup. The heavier the object, the more force it takes to make that object speed up or slow down. It takes more of your strength to push a bowling ball one foot than it does to push a marshmallow one foot. In this video, an astronomer demonstrates Newton’s Second Law of Motion. Or read this eBook, a brief introduction to gravity and motion. Physics explains how a roller coaster moves.


Comet Cratering Experiment

This experiment is a demonstration of Newton’s Second Law of Motion

What You Need:srpcometsetup2

  • Pie Pan or Other Dish with Sides
  • Flour
  • Hot Chocolate Mix
  • 3 Sizes of Marbles or Rocks
  • Spoon

Put several spoonfuls of flour in the bottom of the pan and spread it out to make a level surface. Then sprinkle a thin layer of hot chocolate mix on top of the flour. Now hold one marble/rock above the surface of the flour and drop it. Do the same with the other two marbles/rocks. Now carefully lift each marble/rock out of the flour and look at the impact crater. Which marble/rock made the widest impact crater? Which one made the deepest impact crater?


srpcometfloursrpcometchocolatesrpcometthreesrpcometcratersrpcometcompare1

Science Project Idea:

Do this experiment again. Use three different sizes of marbles. Marbles are great for this project because they are round, which makes measuring the size of the impact crater easier. Remember that in a science experiment you want to test only one variable. In this experiment we only want to change the size/weight of the object that is falling. If we changed the shape of the object too, it would be hard to measure the difference in the impact craters.

While doing the experiment, pay close attention to how far away the marbles are from the surface of the flour before you let go of them. Use a ruler to make sure you drop each marble from exactly one foot above the surface of the flour. Do the experiment three times using the same three objects. The three times you repeat the experiment are called trials. Make a chart to keep track of the results. After each trial measure the width of the impact crater made by each of the three marbles. Which marble makes the largest impact crater? Which marble makes the deepest impact crater? Why do you think so?

Websites for Research:


eBooks:

Use your indyPL Library Card number and PIN to check out FREE Online eBooks, eAudiobooks & Story Videos. Click on a book jacket & enter your Library Card number and PIN to borrow. What’s My PIN?
Junk Drawer ScienceScience Stunts Fun Feats of PhysicsWho Was Isaac Newton?Lives of the Scientists


Books:

Can You Feel the Force?Give It a Push Give It a PullIsaac Newton Discoverer of GravityGiants of Science Isaac NewtonIsaac the AlchemistLaws of Motion and Isaac NewtonPhysics Investigate the Mechanics of NatureProfessor Astrocat's Atomic Adventure a Journey Through PhysicsYou Wouldn't Want to be Sir Isaac NewtonIsaac Newton and Physics for Kids
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Homework Help – Ancient Cultures

Homework Help – Ancient Cultures

More Homework Help

Ancient Worlds

 

In Ancient Worlds, discover the ancient ways of old civilization in Egypt, Greece, and Rome. Find out about the everyday life of the including what they ate, how they dressed, what they believed and what they thought was valuable. Listed below are several other books and website that will help you learn about the ancient world. You may be familiar with ancient Egypt because you have heard of King Tut or the pyramids. You may be familiar with Ancient Greece because you have heard the myths or heard about Ancient Rome and its Coliseum. What do you know, thought, about Ancient India or Ancient Africa? There were cultures living all over the world in ancient times.

At The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis you can see and sometimes touch ancient artifacts. Here are some Ancient Egyptian Artifacts from The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis:

Canopic Jar – “During embalming, the process used to create a mummy, specific internal organs were removed from the body in order to preserve them for the afterlife. Considered to be the most important organs, the lungs, liver, stomach and intestines were carefully stored in special containers called canopic jars.

Mummified Falcon – In Ancient Egypt, “many animals, including falcons and cats, were associated with powerful gods and considered sacred. Once mummfied, they were buried as offerings at temples and shrines dedicated to their associated deities. Falcons were believed to be an animal form taken by the sun god Horus, referred to as the Falcon God.”

Anubis Miniature Statue – “Anubis was the undertaker of the Ancient Egyptian mythological world….his job was to prepare the dead for their journey to eternal life, conduct their funerals, and accompany them to their tombs.”

See more Ancient Artifacts at The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis


Websites, Activities & Printables

World History in Context LogoWorld History in Context: Ancient History is a database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home with your IndyPL Library Card. Login using your library card number and PIN. What’s My PIN? World History in Context will show you magazines, videos and more about ancient civilizations.


IndyPLLibraryCard100
Use your indyPL Library Card number and PIN to check out FREE Online eBooks. Click on a book jacket & enter your Library Card number and PIN to borrow. What’s My PIN?

eBooks:

Female Pharoahs Wore False Beards Book JacketIf I Were a Kid in Ancient ChinaMagic Treehouse Ancient Greece Book JacketMagic Treehouse Ancient Roome Book JacketPocket Genius Ancient Egypt Book JacketPompeii Buried Alive Book JacketTut's Mummy Lost and Found Book JacketWhere is the Great Wall? Book Jacket

Print Books:

Ancient China Beyond the Great WallAncient CommunicationAncient Eygyptian Gods and GoddessesAncient WorldsBlast Back VikingsBuried Beneath UsCang JieEarly Islamic EmpiresEveryday Life in the Ancient WorldExplore Greek MythsExploring the Life Myth and Art of Ancient RomeEyewitness Bible LandsHeroes of the Night SkyHistoriumLearn to Draw Ancient TimesMachu PicchuNational Geographic Ancient IndiaNational Geographic PyramidsOutrageous Women of Ancient TimesYou Wouldn't Want to Live in PompeiiSeven Wonders of Ancient AfricaThe Ancient PersiansThe First Olympics Ancient GreeceThe Griffin and the DinosaurThe Tomb of Tutankhamun<The Totally Gross History of Ancient MesomotamiaWorld Myths and LegendsTotally Wacky Facts about Ancient History

Library Catalog Searches for more Books:

Ancient Africa
Ancient Aztecs
Ancient China
Ancient Egypt
Ancient Greece
Ancient Incas
Ancient India
Ancient Indus Valley
Ancient Mayans
Ancient Mesoamerica (Central & South America)
Ancient Mesopotamia (Middle East)
Ancient North America
Ancient Persia
Ancient Rome
Ancient Mythology

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