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15 Kids’ Classics Then (1917) and Now (2017)

15 Kids’ Classics Then (1917) and Now (2017)

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum was originally published in 1900. When Central Library opened in 1917 this is what the book looked like then. After more than 100 years it is still a favorite! It’s a classic. That means it has stayed popular for a long time. 100 years is definitely a long time! Listed below are 15 classic children’s books that were on the library shelves in 1917 and are still favorites on the library shelves in 2017.

The book covers on the left show you what the books looked like in 1917. Click on one of the old book jackets to read the book online. You don’t even need to wait to check it out. These books are part of the public domain. Public domain means that since these books were published before 1923, they are not subject to copyright. That means you can read them for free!

The book covers on the right show you what the books look like today. Click on one of these newer versions to see it in the computer catalog. You can place a hold there with your library card if you would like to read it. For most of the newer versions just the cover and maybe the illustrations have changed, but for some of them the story has been changed a little to either reflect the times or tell the story in a new way. Try Matt Phelan’s Snow White. It’s a graphic novel version that is really good!

You can find even MORE classic books for kids to read for free at indyPL Kids’: Staying Power – 50 Classic Kids’ Books,  Read.gov: Classic Books and at The International Children’s Digital Library.


The Adventures of Tom SawyerThe Adventures of Tom SawyerThe Adventures of Tom Sawyer – Tells the adventures and pranks of a mischievous boy growing up in a Mississippi River town in the early nineteenth century.


Aesop's FablesAesop's FablesAesop’s Fables – Aesop’s wise, witty and timeless fables. The version on the right sets the fables in an African setting.


Alice's Adventures in WonderlandAlice's Adventures in WonderlandAlice’s Adventures in Wonderland – Offers the classic tale about a young girl who goes on a fantastical trip after falling into a deep hole where she meets a cast of weird and wonderful creatures along the way.


Anne of Green GablesAnne of Green GablesAnne of Green Gables – Anne, an eleven-year-old orphan, is sent by mistake to live with a lonely middle-aged brother and sister on a Prince Edward Island farm and proceeds to make an indelible impression on everyone around her.

 


 

CinderellaCinderellaCinderella – In her haste to flee the palace before the fairy godmother’s magic loses effect, Cinderella leaves behind a glass slipper.


HeidiHeidiHeidi – A Swiss orphan is heartbroken when she must leave her beloved grandfather and their happy home in the mountains to go to school and to care for an invalid girl in the city.

 


 

The Jungle BookThe Jungle BookThe Jungle Book – An anthology of stories chronicles the adventures of Mowgli, a young boy raised by wolves, as he learns the ways of the jungle from Baloo the bear and matches wits with his archenemy, Shere Khan, in a collection that also includes the tale of Rikki-tikki-tavi.


The Little PrincessA Little PrincessA Little Princess – Alone in a new country, wealthy Sara Crewe tries to make friends at boarding school and settle in. But when she learns that she’ll never see her beloved father again, her life is turned upside down. Transformed from princess to pauper, she must swap dancing lessons and luxury for drudgery and a room in the attic. Will she find that kindness and generosity are all the riches she truly needs?


PinocchioPinocchioPinocchio – The adventures of a talking wooden puppet whose nose grows whenever he tells a lie.


The Secret GardenThe Secret GardenThe Secret Garden – A ten-year-old orphan comes to live in a lonely house on the Yorkshire moors where she discovers an invalid cousin and the mysteries of a locked garden.

 


 

Snow WhiteSnow WhiteSnow White – The story of a beleaguered girl who finds shelter with seven dwarves after the sudden death of her father and suffering cruelty at the hands of her stepmother.


The Story of the Three PigsThe Story of the Three PigsThree Little Pigs – The three pigs and their narrow escape of the wolf.


Through the Looking GlassThrough the Looking GlassThrough the Looking Glass – In this sequel to “Alice in Wonderland” Alice goes through the mirror to find a strange world where curious adventures await her.


The Wind in the WillowsThe Wind in the WillowsThe Wind in the Willows – The escapades of four animal friends who live along a river in the English countryside–Toad, Mole, Rat, and Badger.

 


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Favorite Teachers in Chapter Books

Favorite Teachers in Chapter Books

We love teachers! Can you name your very favorite teachers? I can. Miss Sellers, Mr. Yoder, Mrs. Hayworth, Mrs. Reed. I could name more. I was lucky because I had a lot of good ones. Do you have anybody that is Professor McGonagall good? What are the things you like so much about a favorite teacher? My favorite thing in a teacher was someone who didn’t think students were lacking in smart because they were a kid! My favorites listened and also laughed a lot.

Listed below are some all-time favorite teachers from kids’ books. When the librarians in Indianapolis made suggestions for this list – Miss Honey from Matilda was suggested the most often. She gets a gold star!

You might also like taking a look back at Favorite Teachers in Picture Books. I bet you remember Mr. Ratburn and Miss Frizzle! Can you remember what stories they are in or the names of some of the kids in their classes?


Ms. Bixby's Last DayMs. Bixby in Ms. Bixby’s Last Day – Loving their gifted teacher, three boys are dismayed when the teacher falls ill and leaves for the rest of the school year, a situation that compels them to share their stories while cutting class and journeying across town together on a fateful day.


Anne of AvonleaMiss Shirley in Anne of Avonlea – Anne, now sixteen years old and a teacher atAvonlea school, finds that she isn’t much different than her mischievous and spirited pupils.


Because of Mr TerrupMr. Terupt in Because of Mr. Terupt – Seven fifth-graders at Snow Hill School in Connecticut relate how their lives are changed for the better by “rookie teacher” Mr. Terupt. Young Hoosier Book Award, 2012-2013, 4-6 Nominee


Clemetines LetterMr. D’Matz in Clementine’s Letter – Clementine’s beloved teacher, Mr. D’Matz might be leaving for the rest of the year to go on a research trip to Egypt. The only solution, she decides, is to hatch a plan to get Mr. D’Matz back even if it means ruining his once-in-a-lifetime chance.


Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's StoneProfessors Dumbledore, McGonagall, Snape & Hagrid in Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone – Rescued from the outrageous neglect of his aunt and uncle, a young boy with a great destiny proves his worth while attending Hogwarts School for Wizards and Witches.


Ida BMs. Washington in Ida B. – In Wisconsin, fourth-grader Ida B spends happy hours being home-schooled and playing in her family’s apple orchard, until her mother begins treatment for breast cancer and her parents must sell part of the orchard and send her to public school. A Junior Library Guild selection; Young Hoosier Book Award, 2006-2007, 4-6 Nominee


Junie B AlohahaMr. Scary in the Junie B. Jones, First Grader Aloha-ha-ha! – Junie B. and her family are going on a vacation to Hawaii! And ha! Mr. Scary is giving Junie a real, actual camera to keep a photo journal of her trip! But taking good vacation pictures is not always easy. ‘Cause what if your airplane is full of grouchy ladies? And what if there is an unfortunate inner tube incident at the swimming pool? (And, oh my! Let’s not even mention what happens if a tropical bird gets tangled in your hair!) Will Junie B.’s vacation end up picture perfect? Or will her trip to Hawaii be-horrible?


MockingbirdMrs. Brook in Mockingbird – Ten-year-old Caitlin, who has Asperger’s Syndrome, struggles to understand emotions, show empathy, and make friends at school, while at home she seeks closure by working on a project with her father. Young Hoosier Book Award, 2013-2014, 4-6 Nominee.


Operation YesMiss Loupe in Operation YES by Sara Lewis Holmes In her first ever teaching job, Miss Loupe uses improvisational acting exercises with her sixth-grade students at an Air Force base school, and when she experiences a family tragedy, her previously skeptical class members use what they have learned to help her, her brother, and other wounded soldiers.


Gooney Bird is so AbsurdMrs. Pidgeon in Gooney Bird is so Absurd – Mrs. Pidgeon’s second grade class studies poetry and her students write haiku, couplets, free verse, and finally, a tribute to Mrs. Pidgeon‘s mother organized by the irrepressible Gooney Bird Greene.


Love That DogMiss Stretchberry in Love That Dog – A young student, who comes to love poetry through a personal understanding of what different famous poems mean to him, surprises himself by writing his own inspired poem.


Math CurseMrs. Fibonnaci in Math Curse – When the teacher tells her class that they can think of almost everything as a math problem, one student acquires a math anxiety which becomes a real curse.


MatildaMiss Honey in Matilda – Matilda applies her untapped mental powers to rid the school of the evil, child-hating headmistress, Miss Trunchbull, and restore her nice teacher, Miss Honey, to financial security.


Mr Lincolns WayMr. Lincoln in Mr. Lincoln’s Way – When Mr. Lincoln, “the coolest principal in the whole world,” discovers that Eugene, the school bully, knows a lot about birds, he uses this interest to help Eugene overcome his intolerance.


Science VerseMr. Newton in Science Verse – When the teacher tells his class that they can hear the poetry of science in everything, a student is struck with a curse and begins hearing nothing but science verses that sound very much like some well-known poems.


The Art of Miss ChewMiss Chew in The Art of Miss Chew – Describes how a teacher named Miss Chew encouraged individuality, and accepted learning differences, and helped a young student with academic difficulties get extra time to take tests and permission to be in advanced art classes. Inspired by the author’s memories of her art teacher.


The Secret Life of Mrs FinklemanMiss Finkleman in The Secret Life of Ms Finkleman – Spurred by a special project from her social studies teacher, seventh-grader Bethesda Fielding uncovers the secret identity of her music teacher, which leads to a most unusual concert performance and a tutoring assignment.


Sideways Arithmetic from Wayside SchoolMiss Jewls in Sideways Arithmetic from Wayside School – Join Mrs. Jewls’s class and try solving over fifty math puzzles and brainteasers.


The View from SaturdayMrs. Olinski in The View From Saturday – Four students, with their own individual stories, develop a special bond and attract the attention of their teacher, a paraplegic, who chooses them to represent their sixth-grade class in the Academic Bowl competition.


The Wednesday WarsMrs. Baker in The Wednesday Wars – During the 1967 school year, on Wednesday afternoons when all his classmates go to either Catechism or Hebrew school, seventh-grader Holling Hoodhood stays in Mrs. Baker’s classroom where they read the plays of William Shakespeare and Holling learns much of value about the world he lives in.


Word After Word After WordMs. Mirabel in Word After Word After Word – A visiting author teaches five friends about the power of wordsand writing. A Junior Library Guild selection


The Year of Miss AgnesMiss Agnes in The Year of Miss Agnes – Ten-year-old Fred (short for Frederika) narrates the story of school and village life among the Athapascans in Alaska during 1948 when Miss Agnes arrived as the new teacher.

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Author Spotlight: John David Anderson

Author Spotlight: John David Anderson

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Indianapolis’s own John David Anderson has been named the 2017 Indiana Author Award Genre Excellence Winner for Middle Grade Fiction. That’s a long way to say he won an award for writing great books – books kids like – for middle school students. Mr. Anderson is the author of several favorites, including Ms. Bixby’s Last Day, Sidekicked, Minion, Standard Hero Behavior, and The Dungeoneers. A dedicated root beer connoisseur and chocolate fiend, he lives with his wife and two kids right here in Indianapolis. You can learn more at www.johndavidanderson.org.

 

Mr. Anderson’s new book is called Posted. It’s a story about what happens when kids go old-school, using post-it notes to communicate with each other instead of texts or social media when they get their cell phones taken away!

Here are some of the many awards Mr. Anderson’s books have received:

Ms. Bixby’s Last Day

  • The Kirkus Prize 2016 Nominee, Young Readers
  • NCTE Charlotte Huck Award for Outstanding Fiction for Children 2017, Honor
  • Publishers Weekly Best Books of 2016, Middle Grade
  • The New York Times Notable Children’s Books of 2016, Middle Grade
  • New York Public Library 2016 Best Books for Kids, Fiction
  • Booklist 2016 Editors’ Choice, Books for Youth, Middle Readers, Fiction
  • ALSC Notable Children’s Books 2017, Middle Readers
  • 2016 Cybils Finalist, Middle Grade Fiction

The Dungeoneers

  • 2015 Cybils Award Finalist 

Sidekicked

  • 2013 Cybils Award Finalist 

Standard Hero Behavior

  • 2010-2011 Young Hoosier Book Award Nominee
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Homework Help: U.S. States

Homework Help: U.S. States

More Homework Help

 

State Names, Seals, Flags, and Symbols is all that and more. The title of this book could also have included, mottoes, capitols, flowers, birds, trees, sports teams, fairs and more. It is a one stop shop for factual details about each state. Listed below are more eBooks, Books, websites to help you write state reports for social studies.

“This Indiana State Flag rode into space with Hoosier astronaut Joe Allen during his November 1982 mission on the Columbia shuttle. Why do you think states have flags? Do you know the history of the Indiana state flag? To celebrate the 100th anniversary of the state of Indiana, the Daughters of the American Revolution sponsored a competition to create a state flag. Respected Hoosier artist Paul Hadley of Mooresville submitted the winning design. In 1917 the Indiana General Assembly adopted his design.” 

More Indiana Artifacts at The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis


Websites:

Culture Grams States Edition Logo

Culture Grams: States Edition is a database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home with your IndyPL Library Card. Login using your library card number and PIN. What’s My PIN? Choose a state to find up-to-date information for reports including: state symbols, climate, geography, economy, history, population, government, famous people, sports teams, & recipes.


eBooks:

IndyPLLibraryCard100
Use your indyPL Library Card number and PIN to check out FREE Online eBooks and eVideos. Click on a book jacket & enter your Library Card number and PIN to borrow. What’s My PIN?Overdrive

The Midwest and Great Lakes RegionThe Scary States of AmericaThe Scrambled States of America

Print Books:

50 States Our AmericaNational Geographic Beginner's United States AtlasDK State by State AtlasExplore the USA with 50 Fun Filled MapsGreat Lakes States CraftsOur 50 States a Family Adventure Across AmericaNational Geographic Our Fifty States The Handy State by State Answer BookUltimate US Road Trip AtlasUnited Tweets of AmericaUS Geography Through Infographics
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Central Library 100 Years Ago

Central Library 100 Years Ago

Construction began on Central Library in 1916. A cornerstone laying ceremony took place on March 24th. A cornerstone is a corner block in a building’s foundation that is often ceremonial. Many cornerstones include an inscription of the construction dates of the building. Another tradition is putting a time capsule in a cornerstone. A time capsule is a box that contains a selection of objects chosen to be typical of the present time and then buried for opening in the future. Central Library’s cornerstone had a time capsule in it that is 100 years old! We opened it! What do you think was inside?

On the day of Central Library’s cornerstone laying many Indianapolis citizens and community leaders gathered for a celebration. Children convened at Shortridge High School before marching down the street to sing “The Messiah of Nations” to mark the event. “The Messiah of Nations” is a song written by American composer John Philip Sousa. The lyrics to the song were written by Indiana’s own James Whitcomb Riley. If you play the piano or like to sing, you can print a copy of the sheet music from The Library of Congress.

Central Library opened its doors in October 1917. When children entered through the doors on St. Clair Street they walked through the Riley penny gates. These gates were paid for by pennies donated by the children themselves. Once inside, children headed to a space designed just for them called the Riley Room. This room was named to honor James Whitcomb Riley. Riley was a Hoosier who wrote many poems for children and also donated the land Central Library is built on. If you enter Central Library through the doors on St. Clair Street today, you will still walk through the Riley penny gates! The Riley Room for Children was well used and loved as you can see in these old photographs but that space is not used for children anymore. Today Central Library has a space designed specifically for children called the Learning Curve. 

What are some of the biggest differences between children using the library today, and children using the library in the 1920s? How many differences can you spot between the Children’s Room in 1917 and the Learning Curve in 2017?

Librarian’s jobs have changed a great deal since Central Library opened in 1917. Below is a photo of a librarian’s desk at Central Library around 1917. Today librarians use computers, help people check out electronic books, and use the electronic databases to help answer questions over chat. What do you see on this librarian’s desk that could give you a clue about how he/she would have helped someone find the answer to a question in 1917? How might a patron have gotten in touch with this librarian to ask a question?

Today if you want to find a book, you probably use our online catalog. But when Central Library opened you would have walked up to a huge card catalog, pulled out a drawer, and looked up information on index cards. You can still see a card catalog at the Indiana 

State 
Library, complete with the cards. The picture below is of Central’s card catalog in 1917. Do you think this method was easier or harder than how you find a book today? Have you ever used a card catalog?

Even though many things have changed about being a librarian over the last 100 years, some things have remained basically the same. Have you ever seen one of these in a library? Librarians still use book carts today for all manner of things – to move books around, to temporarily store books, and even for displays.

 

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