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Author Spotlight: John David Anderson

Author Spotlight: John David Anderson

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Indianapolis’s own John David Anderson has been named the 2017 Indiana Author Award Genre Excellence Winner for Middle Grade Fiction. That’s a long way to say he won an award for writing great books – books kids like – for middle school students. Mr. Anderson is the author of several favorites, including Ms. Bixby’s Last Day, Sidekicked, Minion, Standard Hero Behavior, and The Dungeoneers. A dedicated root beer connoisseur and chocolate fiend, he lives with his wife and two kids right here in Indianapolis. You can learn more at www.johndavidanderson.org.

 

Mr. Anderson’s new book is called Posted. It’s a story about what happens when kids go old-school, using post-it notes to communicate with each other instead of texts or social media when they get their cell phones taken away!

Here are some of the many awards Mr. Anderson’s books have received:

Ms. Bixby’s Last Day

  • The Kirkus Prize 2016 Nominee, Young Readers
  • NCTE Charlotte Huck Award for Outstanding Fiction for Children 2017, Honor
  • Publishers Weekly Best Books of 2016, Middle Grade
  • The New York Times Notable Children’s Books of 2016, Middle Grade
  • New York Public Library 2016 Best Books for Kids, Fiction
  • Booklist 2016 Editors’ Choice, Books for Youth, Middle Readers, Fiction
  • ALSC Notable Children’s Books 2017, Middle Readers
  • 2016 Cybils Finalist, Middle Grade Fiction

The Dungeoneers

  • 2015 Cybils Award Finalist 

Sidekicked

  • 2013 Cybils Award Finalist 

Standard Hero Behavior

  • 2010-2011 Young Hoosier Book Award Nominee
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Free Children’s Classic eBooks

Free Children’s Classic eBooks

Classic /ˈklasik/ Judged over a period of time to be of the highest quality and outstanding of its kind. Ex. “a classic novel”

If you were alive in 1917 when Central Library was built, this is what one of the bookcases in the children’s section might have looked like.

Listed below are 50 books for kids published before 1917 that were on the shelves back then. These books are classics, having stood the test of time. They have been favorites for more than 100 years! Click on any book jacket to read the book right now! You don’t even need to wait to check it out. These books are part of the public domain. Public domain means that since these books were published before 1923, they are not subject to copyright. That means you can read them for free! You can find even MORE classic books for kids to read for free at Read.gov: Classic Books and at The International Children’s Digital Library.


The Adventures of Huckleberry FinnThe Adventures of Tom SawyerAesop's FablesAlice's Adventures in WonderlandAnne of Green GablesThe Arabian NightsBlack BeautyThe Blue Fairy BookThe Call of the WildA Christmas CarolCinderellaGrimm's Fairy TalesGulliver's TravelsHans BrinkerHans Christian Andersen StoriesHeidiJack and the BeanstackThe Journey to the Centre of the EarthThe Jungle BookKidnappedThe Legend of Sleepy HollowThe Little PrincessLittle WomenThe Merry Adventures of Robin HoodNights with Uncle RemusOliver TwistPeter and WendyPeter RabbitThe Pied Piper of HamlinPinocchioPollyanna width=The Princess and the GoblinRebecca of Sunnybrook FarmRip Van WinkleRobinson CrusoeThe Secret GardenSnow WhiteThe Story of the Champions of the Round TableThe Story of the Three PigsThe Swiss Family RobinsonThe Tales of Mother GooseThe Nutcracker and the Mouse KingThe Three MusketeersThrough the Looking GlassTreasure IslandTwenty Thousand Leagues Under the SeaA Visit from Saint NicholasWhite FangThe Wind in the WillowsThe Wonderful Wizard of Oz
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Homework Help: U.S. States

Homework Help: U.S. States

More Homework Help

 

State Names, Seals, Flags, and Symbols is all that and more. The title of this book could also have included, mottoes, capitols, flowers, birds, trees, sports teams, fairs and more. It is a one stop shop for factual details about each state. Listed below are more eBooks, Books, websites to help you write state reports for social studies.

“This Indiana State Flag rode into space with Hoosier astronaut Joe Allen during his November 1982 mission on the Columbia shuttle. Why do you think states have flags? Do you know the history of the Indiana state flag? To celebrate the 100th anniversary of the state of Indiana, the Daughters of the American Revolution sponsored a competition to create a state flag. Respected Hoosier artist Paul Hadley of Mooresville submitted the winning design. In 1917 the Indiana General Assembly adopted his design.” 

More Indiana Artifacts at The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis


Websites:

Culture Grams States Edition Logo

Culture Grams: States Edition is a database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home with your IndyPL Library Card. Login using your library card number and PIN. What’s My PIN? Choose a state to find up-to-date information for reports including: state symbols, climate, geography, economy, history, population, government, famous people, sports teams, & recipes.


eBooks:

IndyPLLibraryCard100
Use your indyPL Library Card number and PIN to check out FREE Online eBooks and eVideos. Click on a book jacket & enter your Library Card number and PIN to borrow. What’s My PIN?Overdrive

The Midwest and Great Lakes RegionThe Scary States of AmericaThe Scrambled States of America

Print Books:

50 States Our AmericaNational Geographic Beginner's United States AtlasDK State by State AtlasExplore the USA with 50 Fun Filled MapsGreat Lakes States CraftsOur 50 States a Family Adventure Across AmericaNational Geographic Our Fifty States The Handy State by State Answer BookUltimate US Road Trip AtlasUnited Tweets of AmericaUS Geography Through Infographics
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Central Library 100 Years Ago

Central Library 100 Years Ago

Construction began on Central Library in 1916. A cornerstone laying ceremony took place on March 24th. A cornerstone is a corner block in a building’s foundation that is often ceremonial. Many cornerstones include an inscription of the construction dates of the building. Another tradition is putting a time capsule in a cornerstone. A time capsule is a box that contains a selection of objects chosen to be typical of the present time and then buried for opening in the future. Central Library’s cornerstone had a time capsule in it that is 100 years old! We opened it! What do you think was inside?

On the day of Central Library’s cornerstone laying many Indianapolis citizens and community leaders gathered for a celebration. Children convened at Shortridge High School before marching down the street to sing “The Messiah of Nations” to mark the event. “The Messiah of Nations” is a song written by American composer John Philip Sousa. The lyrics to the song were written by Indiana’s own James Whitcomb Riley. If you play the piano or like to sing, you can print a copy of the sheet music from The Library of Congress.

Central Library opened its doors in October 1917. When children entered through the doors on St. Clair Street they walked through the Riley penny gates. These gates were paid for by pennies donated by the children themselves. Once inside, children headed to a space designed just for them called the Riley Room. This room was named to honor James Whitcomb Riley. Riley was a Hoosier who wrote many poems for children and also donated the land Central Library is built on. If you enter Central Library through the doors on St. Clair Street today, you will still walk through the Riley penny gates! The Riley Room for Children was well used and loved as you can see in these old photographs but that space is not used for children anymore. Today Central Library has a space designed specifically for children called the Learning Curve. 

What are some of the biggest differences between children using the library today, and children using the library in the 1920s? How many differences can you spot between the Children’s Room in 1917 and the Learning Curve in 2017?

Librarian’s jobs have changed a great deal since Central Library opened in 1917. Below is a photo of a librarian’s desk at Central Library around 1917. Today librarians use computers, help people check out electronic books, and use the electronic databases to help answer questions over chat. What do you see on this librarian’s desk that could give you a clue about how he/she would have helped someone find the answer to a question in 1917? How might a patron have gotten in touch with this librarian to ask a question?

Today if you want to find a book, you probably use our online catalog. But when Central Library opened you would have walked up to a huge card catalog, pulled out a drawer, and looked up information on index cards. You can still see a card catalog at the Indiana 

State 
Library, complete with the cards. The picture below is of Central’s card catalog in 1917. Do you think this method was easier or harder than how you find a book today? Have you ever used a card catalog?

Even though many things have changed about being a librarian over the last 100 years, some things have remained basically the same. Have you ever seen one of these in a library? Librarians still use book carts today for all manner of things – to move books around, to temporarily store books, and even for displays.

 

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Homework Help: Explorers

Homework Help: Explorers

More Homework Help

 

Do you think you have what it takes to be a trailblazer? In the Ultimate Explorer Guide, follow along as modern day explorers unearth ancient mummies, encounter wild animals and use the latest technologies in space travel. This book features explorers of all kinds: paleontologists, biologists, photographers, artists, conservationists, and more. 

An explorer is someone who investigates the unknown or unfamiliar in order to learn about it. The unknown can be geographic (a place) or it can be an experience or idea. Because they go where others haven’t, geographic explorers are often associated with certain personality traits like bravery, confidence and curiosity. Their adventures make great stories!

There are many well known explorers from history, especially from the period know as the age of exploration when the earth was not fully explored or mapped yet. This was the time of Columbus, de Soto, Magellan and many more. In the following centuries humans added the exploration of space. The first space explorers are well known too – Armstrong, Glenn, Shepard & Aldrin.

Use the resources on this page to learn about the explorers of the past as well as those today who continue to discover new frontiers on earth and beyond. You can also learn about the tools and technologies explorers have used to help them navigate to new and unexplored places.

The device on the right is called an octant. It is an Artifact at The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis. “An octant is a navigational tool that is similar to a sextant. It was used mostly to determine latitude at sea. It measures angles by observing the sun or stars and the horizon in reflecting mirrors. It is called an octant because the maximum angle it can measure is one-eighth of a circle, or 45°. This octant was made around 1800.”


Websites, Activities & Printables:

World History in Context LogoWorld History in Context: Age of Exploration is a database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home with your IndyPL Library Card. Login using your library card number and PIN. What’s My PIN? World History in Context will show you biographies, magazines, videos and more about explorers.

 

Biography in Context: Explorers is another database you can use in any IndyPL Library Branch or at home with your IndyPL Library Card. Login using your library card number and PIN. What’s My PIN? Biography in Context will show you biographies, magazines, videos and more about world explorers. Pick a name from their list to learn more about that explorer.​


IndyPLLibraryCard100Use your indyPL Library Card number and PIN to check out FREE Online eBooks. Click on a book jacket & enter your Library Card number and PIN to borrow. What’s My PIN?Overdrive Logo

eBooks:

Lives of the Explorers Book JacketThe Quest for Z Book JacketI Columbus Book Jacket

Print Books:

Who Was First Book JacketEyewitness Explorer Book JacketAlexander the Great Book JacketAmerican Archaeology Uncovers Vikings Book JacketColumbus Book JacketDown the Colorado Book JacketExploration and Discovery Book JacketExplore the Most Dangerous Journeys of All TimeExplore with Lewis and Clark Book JacketWomen Explorers Book JacketExplorers Book JacketInto the West Book JacketMarco Polo Book JacketSylvia Earle Ocean Explorer Book JacketThe Plant Hunters Book JacketZheng He the Great Chinese Explorer Book JacketByrd and Igloo Book JacketA World of Her Own Book JacketConquistadors Book Jacket
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