Category Archives: Staff Recommend

Grin and Bear It

Grin and Bear It

Grin and Bear It

Will stage fright prevent a very funny bear from becoming a stand-up comedian?

Have you ever wanted to do something, but were too afraid to try? Well Bear knows exactly what you are going through. Bear is a comedian who really wants to make his friends laugh. His jokes are hilarious, he does great in front of the mirror at home, and he is really cool. There is just one problem: Bear gets terrible stage fright. Can Bear get over his fears and make his own dreams come true? OR Will bear end up embarrassing himself in front of his friends? Find out by reading Grin and Bear It by Leo Landry.

Recommended by: Kamara McKinney - Spades Park Branch Library

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Allie Finkle’s Rules for Girls: Moving Day

Allie Finkle’s Rules for Girls: Moving Day

Allie Finkle's Rules for Girls: Moving Day

Nine-year-old Allie Finkle has rules for everything and is even writing her own rule book, but her world is turned upside-down when she learns that her family is moving across town, which will mean a new house, school, best friend, and plenty of new rules.

Allie Finkle appreciates rules. There are lots of rules for math and science. But, there aren’t many rules for friendship, and this makes Allie’s life a little complicated. There are also not many rules about what to do when your parents decide to move across town, which means that you have to go to a new school. And get rid of most of your awesome geode collection. And leave behind your best friend (who can be a little bit of a crybaby, so maybe that’s not too bad). Allie’s homemade notebook of rules may be her only option for survival.

Recommended by: Hannah Wheeler – Lawrence Branch Library

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Carbonel the King of the Cats

Carbonel the King of the Cats

Carbonel King of the Cats

Rosemary’s plan to clean houses during her summer break and surprise her mother with the money she earns hits a snag when an old lady at the market talks her into buying a second-rate broom and a cat she can’t even afford to keep.

Inquisitive and adventurous children, talking cats, and flying rocking chairs and brooms = an endearing jFiction comfort series, which also includes The Kingdom of Carbonel (2009); and Carbonel and Calidor (2009). Yes, magic and witchcraft are involved. Author Barbara Sleigh (1906-1982) worked for the BBC Children’s Hour, so it’s not surprising that meanness is vanquished in this New York Review Children’s Collection trio. The illustrations are charming in this 1955 book that was reissued in 2004 and in the sequels that the New York Review Collection added five years later.

Recommended by: Diane Palguta, College Avenue Branch

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Lincoln’s Grave Robbers

Lincoln’s Grave Robbers

Lincoln's Grave Robbers

Describes how a counterfeiting ring plotted to ransom Lincoln’s body to secure the release of their imprisoned ringleader, and how a fledging Secret Service and an undercover agent conducted a daring election-night sting operation.

Counterfeiting, the Secret Service, and Abraham Lincoln.  Though seeming to have little in common, the connection between these three led to an incredible chain of events in 1875.  When master counterfeiter Benjamin Boyd  is arrested, members of the counterfeiting ring conspire to steal the body of Abraham Lincoln from his resting place and ransom his body for money and demand Boyd freed from prison.  With Secret Service on their heels, the conspirators unknowingly allow a double agent in on the plot, who kept the Secret Service updated every step of the way and ultimately helped bring about the downfall of the conspirators.

            Based on true events, Sheinkin has created a thrilling and suspenseful true crime account for  children that reveals much about the counterfeiting problems that plagued the later part of the 19th century.  Even more, children will be fascinated by the crime-fighting methods of that time, and will be drawn in  by the action and liveliness of the plot.   With just the right amount off factual information woven into the story, readers will find themselves on a rollicking historical ride that won’t stop until the thrilling conclusion.  A must-read for children!  

Recommended by: Emily Chandler, Lawrence Library

 

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Double Identity

Double Identity

Double Identity

Thirteen-year-old Bethany’s parents have always been overprotective, but when they suddenly drop out of sight with no explanation, leaving her with an aunt she never knew existed, Bethany uncovers shocking secrets that make her question everything she thought she knew about herself and her family. Young Hoosier Book Award, 2009-2010, 6-8 Nominee.

“Bethany’s near perfect world is shattered just prior to her thirteenth birthday.  Her parents flee their home and drive to a strange town arriving in the middle of the night.  They abandon Bethany with an aunt she never even knew existed.  Dad tells her he will call when he can, but she is not to contact them.  Bethany overhears him tell Aunt Myrlie, “She doesn’t know about Elizabeth”.  “Who is Elizabeth?” Beth wonders.  To add to the mystery the townspeople who meet Bethany react like they have seen a ghost.  Eventually Bethany learns she looks identical to this Elizabeth, right down to the seven freckles on her nose.  As she struggles to unravel the mystery of her past, she discovers a strange man is stalking her and asking questions about her father.  This gripping science fiction story will keep you in suspense until the very end.”

Recommended by: Linda Tegmeyer, Brightwood Library

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