Category Archives: Poetry

Staff Rec Outreach What the Heart Knows

Staff Rec Outreach What the Heart Knows

What the Heart Knows

Presents a collection of inspirational poems that offer hope, wisdom, comfort, and humor for life’s challenging moments.

A tall and thin volume of poems to invite our better thoughts and actions, complete with lovely illustrations and a red ribbon book mark.   Find the words here to repair a friendship, gift a spell, bless the curl of the cat, or the smell of a dog.   These poems are sorted into chants, charms, spells, laments, and blessings.  Wonderful to read even better to share; memorize, add your voice, and share with someone of your choice.

Recommended by: Barbara Obergfell, OutreachLibrary

 

 

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April National Poetry Month – Hoosier Poet James Whitcomb Riley

April National Poetry Month – Hoosier Poet James Whitcomb Riley

rileyIn 1912, Hoosier poet James Whitcomb Riley finished his last recording session for the Victor Talking Machine Company. Out of around twenty recordings made during five days of readings, only four of the discs were ever issued by Victor.

The James Whitcomb Riley Recordings at the Indianapolis Public Library consist of 17 unpublished recordings of Mr. Riley reading his work. There are sad poems, happy poems, stories, tales, and a funny little speech, The Soldier’s Story, that Riley must have told many times.

These may well be the only copies in existence of these titles – the only copy, for instance, of Riley himself reading When the Frost is on the Punkin. There is a lot of static…there were no high fidelity recordings in 1912, but you can follow along with the words and hear the poet himself read the poem the way he meant it to be read.

Websites:

James Whitcomb Riley Books:

The Best of James Whitcomb Riley Child Rhymes When the Frost is on the Punkin The Gobble-uns’ll get you ef you don’t watch out!
Little Orphant Annie

Recommended by: Janet Spaulding, Selection Services

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April National Poetry Month – Try These: Books in Verse

April National Poetry Month – Try These: Books in Verse

National Poetry Month is a national celebration of poetry established by the Academy of American Poets. The books on this page are chapter book stories…written in verse. You might not think of these kinds of books right away when you think of poetry. The word “poetry” probably makes you think of “Where the Sidewalk Ends” and Shel Silverstein. But these books are poetry too, and how amazing, an author writing a whole chapter book in verse.

 

 

Brains for Lunch All the Broken Pieces Love That Dog Out of the Dust
Gone Fishing Inside Out and Back Again Little Dog Lost May B
Planet Middle School The Secret of Me Running With Trains The Wild Book

Books recommended by: Janet Spaulding, Selection Services

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Staff Recommend Garfield Park – Never Forgotten

Staff Recommend Garfield Park – Never Forgotten

Never Forgotten

In eighteenth-century West Africa, a boy raised by his blacksmith father and the Mother Elements–Wind, Fire, Water, and Earth–is captured and taken to America as a slave.

“Loved ones are never forgotten
When we continue to tell their stories.” (from back cover of the book)

Before reading this story/poem, learn a new word “griot” – meaning a West African storyteller, praise singer, poet, and musician.  The griot relates the story of Dinga, the blacksmith, and his son Musafa, who becomes one of “the Taken”.  Dinga calls to the four elements – earth, fire, water, wind – to find his son.  Each element tells about its search, and wind, becoming a hurricane to cross the ocean, finds Musafa – a slave apprenticed to a blacksmith. The drawing by Leo and Diane Dillon enliven the story, making it a work of art.

Recommended by Cindy Childers, Garfield Park Branch Library

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Kid Review from Mia: Emily and Carlo

Kid Review from Mia: Emily and Carlo

Emily and CarloThe only sibling left in the Dickinson house In Amherst, Massachusetts, in the winter of 1849, Emily gets a dog who becomes her constant companion and who is featured in some of the poems she writes. Includes brief notes on the life and work of Emily Dickinson.

Mia says:

I read this book with my great-aunt last week-end and I love it. The story, the poems and the pictures are beautiful! The story of a very large dog and a very small woman that loved to write poetry – Emily Dickinson. My favorite poem in the story is:

Twas my one glory
Let it be
Remembered
I was owned of thee.”

Emily and her dog, Carlo, were best friends and loved to walk and watch – flowers, frogs, everything. They were best friends! I love gardens, dogs and poems! I hope you like it too.”

Some more books you might like about the writer Emily Dickinson – her life and her poetry:
My Uncle Emily Emily Dickinson's Letters to the World The Mouse of Amhurst Emily
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