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Staff Picks

May 18, 2015

Bones on the Ground

Bones on the Ground
by O,Maley, Elizabeth
970.1 OMA

With the state’s bicentennial quickly approaching, there will likely be renewed interest in Indiana’s history. We may hear a lot about the state’s founders and the new settlements they created, but what is not often talked about is the numerous Native American tribes who struggled to maintain possession of their lands in the face of widespread white settlement. While the U.S. adopted an Indian policy and white settlers pushed further west, many Native Americans fought their intruders, while others adopted their ways. Very little remains from the tribes, and the answer to what happened to them is different depending on which point of view you hear.

Bones on the Ground presents the story of the Old Northwest Territory from before the American Revolution through the removal of the Miami from Indiana in 1846. Sketches of people and places such as the Battle of Tippecanoe, the Potawatomi Trail of Death, William Wells, and Little Turtle are presented in first-person narratives and biographical sketches. O’Maley does an incredible job of bringing these vibrant characters to life and showing both sides of the expansion story. If we think only of the white settlers who marked their new territory, we’re neglecting the Native Americans who called our state home long before it was indeed a state.

              --Recommended by Carrie Voliva, Pike Library

 

 

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